The Hive Recap: Effects of External Conditions

The Hive’s Own Observations & Unexpected Results

Effects of External Conditions: Mind-Bender

Alison plays Sarah for Kira and Mrs. S, while Helena plays Sarah playing Beth, after discovering Sarah was playing Beth, and that Beth is dead:  the Killer and Sarah play Beth well enough to fool Raj, Paul, Art, and DeAngelis, – and Alison fools Mrs. S as Sarah. The Killer and Kira both create unique artwork for Sarah…

So perhaps they do share a common predisposition… for the Creative Arts.

Alison can't fool Kira.

Alison as Sarah doesn’t fool Kira.

Why do some clones fool only some of the people most of the time?

The successful imposters, con artists, great detectives, magicians and illusionists will assure you that we are all victims of our own expectations and perceptions. If you do not imagine a genetic identical has replaced the person you think you know, only some flaw in their performance could expose them.

Why does The Killer’s criminal profile so deeply affect and motivate Sarah?

If you listen carefully, many of Art and DeAngelis’s assumptions about the unknown suspect behind the evidence are very similar to Sarah’s own background and criminal profile. She uses these as well as the striking differences, to reach out to the killer… and vice versa.

How many characters are connected by the ‘fish glyph’ in this episode?

Three, but only two are still alive.  Of the two living, only one is clearly identified in this episode.

Gone fishing.

Gone fishing.

Why do some clones have different hair color than the others?

As our series is based in a reality we can all recognize (twenty minutes from now), our clones express themselves (and their identity) just like we all do:  they make choices about their appearance, for instance.  Some clones color their hair.

What’s a ‘cootie-catcher’? (and why was the name changed in the show?)

To the Canadian writers, a ‘cootie-catcher’ is what we all commonly called the paper origami fortune teller as children. It was removed as a term in the script to more simply identify the object in play, for folks who may not share the Canadian love of localisms.

Cootie catcher?

Cootie catcher?

Was there really a message in the cootie-catcher?

Yes, the cootie-catcher was designed by the writer of this episode to be fully-functioning as a 3-D prop-plot point. It took several tries to create a working model that would help Art pursue a murderer, and help Sarah understand what kind of clone she was dealing with.  The design was inspired by a free online website created by teachers who offered model paper fortune tellers you can make at home, to help make learning the science of origami, puzzles and codes fun. Thank you, teachers!

Which acclaimed stage plays are referenced in this episode (and why)?

Robert Harling’s “Steel Magnolias,” and “Pygmalion,” by English playwright George Bernard Shaw. (Hard-core film fans will note that Felix references the 1989 film version of “Steel Magnolias” when he asks if Alison played “the Daryl Hannah part.”) Both were chosen as acute examples of female identity issues in popular fiction that beautifully echoed the themes of this episode.

What’s a ‘reverse Pygmalion’?

More word-play from the Canadian writers! A Pygmalion is about turning a working class young woman into a convincing portrait of a middle class lady. So the reverse, it seemed to us, would be Felix coaching a middle class lady like Alison into a convincing performance as street urchin, Sarah.

Where did the fish glyph come from, and what does it mean?

The fish glyph, and indeed all the symbols in this episode as the result of combining social science research with some reading up on codes and symbols popular in many cultures over many ages, around the world. The fish, as Cosima points out, has a nearly universal history among humans as a symbol of fecundity, fertile waters – if you will. It is also historically significant in several Christian sects, and so appropriate as an emblem of Helena’s faith-based aims.

Who is the man in the black hat?

The man in the black hat is identified in coming episodes, so – keep watching!

Who is Helena's mystery savior?

Who is mystery man?

NEXT: Visit the Hive wet lab and library >

  • http://twitter.com/tomincmh Tom A.

    Absolutely loving the show so far. Tatiana is a revelation

  • Matthew Markovich

    9 clones 4 dead? Who are the others? Did I mis something?

    • Alyssa

      Cosima, Sarah, Alison, and Helena are alive. There is probably a European clone that still needs to be introduced. The European clones were Katja, a clone in France, a clone in Italy, and a clone in Austria. Plus Beth, that’s nine.

  • Jeremy Richardson

    Love the show – Tataiana Maslany is quite spectacular, even though her english accent is more Canberra than Camden.

    A slap on the wrist for you blog writer though – George Bernard Shaw was Irish, not English…

  • http://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.nelson2 Elizabeth Nelson

    Love the show. Would love to get playlist of music used in the show not jusr as a mood enhancer for character development. Cloning is such a fascinating issue…nature vs nurture, organ farms, genetic breeding for DNA refining, etc. So many possibilities to go for right or wrong. Human nature is a capricious animal.