Author Archives: Toni Hargis

Interacting with Law Enforcement: What Brits in America Should Know

Most of us are familiar with the regular American police officer from watching cop shows over the years. They wear the dark blue uniform, a peaked cap and pack a serious amount of heat around their often-expansive midriffs.

Queuing and Keeping Right: How to Navigate America

Although it’s not quite as rigid as keeping to the right on the London Underground, and you won’t provoke the same rage if you err, there actually is a loose system when walking around in the U.S.

A Dress Code for Brits in America

Most of my visitors from the U.K. invariably remark on how “casual” the American dress code appears.

Go On, Introduce Yourself: What Brits in America Must Learn to Do

Picture the scene, Brits: you’re at a party, and you start chatting to your friend’s neighbor, who seems like a very nice person. You have lots in common and are getting on like a house on fire.

What Can Brits Learn from American Optimism?

One thing Brits notice about Americans is their eternal optimism; there’s nothing that can’t be done. From running for President to getting sold out tickets for your favorite band, anything’s possible.

A Brit Weighs in on America’s ‘Open Kitchen’ Debate

When looking at housing options in the U.S., Brits will notice a distinct lack of doors and walls.

Themed Vacations: Ideas for Brits in America

As I’ve mentioned before, this country is vast. When thinking of vacations, the plethora of choice sometimes leaves me paralyzed with indecision. Should we go hot, cold, beach, desert or big city?

Brits in America: 5 Small Signs You’re Going Native

Most expats probably don’t realize if and when they “go native.” As a Brit in the U.S.

Why Americans Don’t Understand the Roundabout

In 2013 the British Roundabout Appreciation Society (yes, there is one and don’t laugh) awarded Columbus Circle, in New York City, Best Roundabout in the World.

5 Very American Ways for Brits to See the U.S.

There is so much to do and see in the U.S. that you can be here a lifetime and barely scratch the surface.