5 Reasons for a Brit to Marry an American

(Working Title Films)

If you can manage to marry a famous American, even better! (Working Title Films)

Marriage is one of the leading reasons Brits relocate to the United States, and there are a number of reasons as to why. For now, let’s take it as read that love and companionship are reasons that need no introduction. Instead, we’re going to take a look at some of the more superficial (okay, shallow) reasons to marry an American if you’re British.

1. You get to live in the United States
It’s the country that brought you your favorite films, music and fast food outlets. You’ve interacted with American tourists and/or university students in your own country and secretly—or perhaps openly—you’ve desired nothing more than to switch places with them, to live in the United States of America. Well, if you fall in love with, and subsequently marry, an American citizen, then such a transition is about to become a real possibility. Of course, even once you’ve tied the knot, there is still a mountain of paperwork to get through in order to become a resident. Thankfully, we have number two on this list.

2. Applying for a residency visa will be more straightforward
As I outlined in a previous article, the visa process can offer its fair share of surprises; however, if you are applying for residency through your marriage to an American citizen, the process is arguably more straightforward than one can expect to find through other channels. That is not to say it is a walk in the park, by any means. But aside from the fact that a legitimate marriage is somewhat easy to prove, you will have that other person—your spouse—to help you through the process.

3. If you can survive a long distance relationship, he or she must be worth it!
While I can honestly say that a long-distance relationship is not easy, the rewards of persevering through one should not be overlooked. Until one of you is ready to move to the other’s country of residence, there’s a good chance that you’ll be conducting your relationship either side of a 3,500-mile-wide ocean. If you find yourself in this position, and the two of you remain together afterward, your relationship will be all the stronger for it.

4. Being British, your in-laws are more likely to warm to you
We all know that meeting his or her parents for the first time can be a daunting prospect. You might say something that rubs them up the wrong way or you might accidentally knock a priceless vase off the mantelpiece (I assure you I’m not speaking from experience). Thankfully, if your other half’s parents are American, you might just have a get-out-of-jail-free card. This is because Americans—and I am generalizing with wild abandon here—love a British accent. Indeed, merely having the accent might constitute something of an ice-breaker.

5. Your friends back home will be impressed that you landed an American
And here is the most superficial reason of all. Just as having a British spouse is the source of bragging rights for an American citizen, the same is true in reverse. While we Brits might be less inclined to admit it, there is a certain novelty—a sense of occasion—attached to meeting an American in our homeland. We’ve seen them in the movies, now we get to meet one in the actual flesh. Simply having American friends can be enough to turn heads, but starting a relationship with one might just become—if only for a moment—the talking point of the town.

Are you married to an American, tell us your story! How did you meet? 

See More:
5 Clues That Your Becoming Americanized, Brits
What To Do If You Get Cold Feet Before Making the Move to America
5 Financial Reasons Brits Should Move to the U.S.

  • expatmum

    And after 23 years of marriage, your American spouse can still teach you new things about the USA on a daily basis! (They also sometimes make them up, just to keep you on your toes.)

    • maggie

      Really????

      • frozen01

        I would never make things up, mostly because my Brit hubby did that to me last time we were in the UK and I completely fell for it :P

    • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

      Ha! Good for him. ;-)

    • http://www.meaganadelelopez.com/ Meagan

      Amazing. I swear I learn new things about the UK everyday as well. Like, who knew the word “moreish” had so many uses!!

  • maggie

    Actually I never wanted to live in the US but happened to fall in love with an American.

  • Tim Haselden

    May you both have a very happy anniversary.. I’d give it a go, but if I can’t find a British woman daft enough to be with me, I don’t think American girls are that much different. ;-)

    • ebeth

      I think you’re wrong there. America is a VERY big country, with extremely diverse tastes in everything (like 50 small countries and cultures in one area), and that most definitely include men! And American women are very liberal in their tastes as well. I fell for an Englishman who was on holiday with friends. His buddy who always “got the girls” in London, ended up having his face slapped. Twice. And Stephen (the one I adored) was adored by ALL the women! My friends were insanely jealous we had met first. HIs buddies kept saying over and over, “Girls NEVER notice him back home! He never gets asked out, either! Why are all the women hitting on HIM??” My best friends said, “He’s sweet and cute. That’s what all the women I know like.” In fact, all his friends EXCEPT Glen met a special lady here. Different culture for sure. I mean, people are people but for some reason shyer Englishmen get a ton of attention here.

      • Tim Haselden

        I don’t think anyone’s described me as cute… Nice, yes .. Nice, that rating just below boring yet just above newly dead. With a background . in Mathematics & computing I can honestly say that out there in the universe there are two definate probabilities a…..A woman who will love me for who I am b……A Government that REALLY knows what it’s doing…..I know what my monies on NASA finding first. ;-)

        • ebeth

          Hahahaha!

    • dw

      You need to watch “Love Actually”.

      • Tim Haselden

        I did, I’m way worse looking than any of them in that…

    • TMarius

      All you need is the accident. Just speak in Britishisms for 20 minutes while trying to maintain an air of sophistication and intelligence. At that point, the woman you’re talking to will probably just get naked right there.

      Oh, but you gotta have a very forward attitude here. Confidence is huge, but so is chivalry. If she thinks you look good, the only way you’ll probably be able to tell in most cases is that she’ll make eye contact with you a few times.

      You will get shut down from time-to-time, but the accent will no doubt tip the scales in your favor many a time.

  • Martin

    I’m a Brit married to American woman. Been in USA for 15 years. Honestly, almost all of this complete rubbish.

    • TMarius

      Why?

  • Emily Anne Price

    If a Brit married this American we’re staying in England lol. I’ve been in love with England for as long as I can remember and if I can live there I most definitely am :D.

    • bbdrvr

      I’m right there with you (though I’d be happy with Wales or possibly Scotland). My first thought upon reading #1 was, “But why would they *want* to live here?”

      • frozen01

        Wales is lovely. It doesn’t deserve the ribbing it gets.

        • bbdrvr

          I agree – very underrated as a travel destination. I’ve been there twice. Well, if you count Cardiff (many don’t), but I did make it up into the Valleys on my second trip. Loved it there.

          • Tamara Benson

            North Wales is GORGEOUS! I cannot recommend it enough!

          • bbdrvr

            It’s high on my bucket list. I want to rent a car and drive through the whole of Wales one day.

          • Tamara Benson

            That would be lovely! We are hoping to get back this summer to see the grandkids. I used to work in Llanfairpwll. The people were so nice to me there, even though I was American!

        • TMarius

          It’s really more about the sound that comes out of the inhabitant’s mouths.

      • dw

        Mind the Gap seems to be full of Americans who want to move to the UK. Maybe it should relaunch as a singles site?

      • BlackHedgehog

        Here’s the thing though…it’s always the reverse. I always ask myself…why would they *want* to live here…here being England.

    • Béla Fekete

      You would HATE ENGLAND, Once you get to see first hand the English CHAV you would run run screaming back to the USA, The average English person in cities ( CHAVS ) have absolutely no respect very little education very little potential to be anything other than the wasteful scrounging low life no hoper VANDALS and criminals they were raised to be by Parents who really don’t give a crap about what they do when they are out of the house so long as they can drink and watch Eastenders on tv un disturbed..

      • nb

        wow, what a sad view of England you have.

      • Lynn Michael Rappolt

        that sounds just like were I live in the USA-southern West Virginia

        • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

          I’m from WV and trust me, there’s a difference between young people in our state and the young people he is talking about.

      • valhalla

        What a shame you think this about England. England is actually beautiful and many many people are smart. We have a wonderful health care system.
        Every country has vandals, not just England.

        • Béla Fekete

          Seriously, I was born in and grew up in Birmingam, the inner cities and outer suburbs are teeming with chavs, who hang around in gangs terrorising a few select families on any housing estate and the worst that can be done to these god awfull ENGLISH delinquents is that we slap an ASBO on them which they wear with pride like a badge of honour. Don’t tell me this is not true because it is.. Vicky Pollard has been cloned millions of times over and overun England. I now live in the USA and the difference between the young in England and the USA is astronomical, Here in the USA they are still taught to respect and DO respect in England in the sadly vast majority of cases the young are taught by their useless parents to say F*** you before breaking your windows !

          • dw

            Have you considered commenting on Daily Mail articles rather than here?

          • Béla Fekete

            No.

          • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

            Sorry to say, i don’t disagree with what you just wrote. There’s a lot of love for the UK on this site and many expats and Anglophiles view it through rose-coloured glasses but it certainly has its fair share of problems.

          • Maleficent

            As do ALL countries.

          • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

            Of course.

          • JoAnn Hawkins

            America has parts like this too. sadly, it can happen anywhere. We have scary places filled with violent and disrespectful people. we also have beautiful places & wonderful people. I’m guessing the UK also has this variety.

          • Linda Tompkins

            Not in my home town. It is nothing like you are describing even though I left 25 years ago I still keep in touch and visit I miss it very much and only left because of who I married.

          • bbdrvr

            Hate to tell you this, but in a lot of places in the USA you’d be receiving the same treatment or worse if your skin was darker.

            We have the same attitude you described towards immigrants here, but in this day and age, that only applies to people of color. (In times past, it also applied to Irish and Italian immigrants, but those days are over.) If you’re white, it doesn’t matter where you came from. We don’t have the built-in prejudice against eastern and central Europeans that you find in much of the UK.

          • TMarius

            This is still sadly true in many places.

          • Linda Tompkins

            I disagree I have seen many areas in the US where the prejudice is against whites. We were ignored in a store until we left.

          • TMarius

            The secret to all that respect is guns.

            I’m completely serious, by the way. Ever since we started colonizing out towards the Pacific Coast, people had to be their own police, and thus fights happened very easily and ended in death. It became a necessity to treat everyone politely.

          • TMarius

            Most of our criminals are more concerned with making money through selling drugs than with harassing people or destroying property. Even the street scum have that ruthless capitalist spirit.

          • Kart180

            Sorry, but I do agree, I see the UK as a nice place since I was born and educated there but I would love to stay in the states, It just more opportunities.

          • hortilius

            come visit L.A. and see what real problems are. how about hardened street gangs? vandals are nothing.

      • Emily Anne Price

        @Bela I’m sorry that you see England that way but to be perfectly honest there are people like that all over the world. You just have to ignore them and see that beautiful historic country as it is.

        • Béla Fekete

          I was born and raised there, I only speak it like it is. I had to deliberately keep my sons away from the other kids on the street I would not let them associate with them at all. The result was my sons went on to graduate university, the others went on to drop out of schools become vandals car thieves criminals and jail fodder. I’m sorry to depose your idylic fantasy of England but seriously its not what you imagine and if you went to live there you would also not be accepted as easily as I was here in the USA there you would be classified as just another Bloody foreigner.. irrespective if you live law abidingly or not you would be forever an outsider to the English. England is very intolerant of foreigners, believe me I speak through experience I was born there yet I was always a “F****** Foreigner” In my country of birth.

          • nb

            I was born and raised in south east London, finished school, went to college, got a good job and then got married before I had kids. If that makes me a chav so be it, its worked ok for me.
            And wherever you go you’ll find undesirables, I know this because I’ve lived in the U.S too.

          • Linda Tompkins

            So your kids were too good to play with the local kids, maybe thats why there was an attitude towards you.

          • Grant

            Have you ever lived in a ghetto?

          • Linda Tompkins

            Yes, a lot of people doing the best they can mixed in with some assholes. We just avoided the assholes.

          • Béla Fekete

            LMAO no the attitude towards us was with us from my first day at school the second that The ENGLISH heard my surname that was it, Just like when I started new job walked in everything fine My name was mentioned then automatically that WALL in the eyes went right up and I was automatically just another bloody foreigner !

          • Linda Tompkins

            Even with a British name I got the same kind of reaction because there was so many of us and we had different last names. I had good grades so was sent I a different school and got that wall as soon as my address was mentioned.

      • daisyandus

        or any large urban city in the U.S. (must be more widespread that I originally thought…)

      • RJKL

        The people who live in cities in the UK aren’t very much different from the people who live in cities in the US. There are criminals, vandals, bad parents, and uneducated morons, of course (the last two especially are certainly not exclusive to urban areas), but a huge majority of them are just normal people trying to live their lives.

        I will say, however, that there is a certain strain of (usually English) people who have nothing better to do than complain about youth culture, immigrants, and people on benefits. Those are the ones most likely to put you off of living in England.

        • janet_e_h

          There is a certain strain of Americans who fit that profile, too! (Often they are tea partiers, though not always-there are supercilious, holier-than-thou left wing types also.)

          • bbdrvr

            True. UKIP (a lot of ‘em, anyway) and the BNP would get along fabulously with the teabaggers.

        • TMarius

          In America you find them rocking on porches and shouting behind screen doors.

      • Scritty

        Might be where you live. I love my city (Worcester) – current floods and all – I have lived in a few other places, but Worcestershire is a brilliant place to live. Most people work, most people are friendly and the weather most of the time is great. Adult nightlife (good large bars where over 30′s go – no “kids” – live music) some great venues, great restaurants, great shopping, lovely countryside, loads of history. Love it. :)

        • Béla Fekete

          Yes if your ENGLISH to begin with, I was born in ( Brum )
          England to begin with of Hungarian parentage. Strange then how I was Always just a bloody Foreigner to the English throughout my whole life in England.

          • Linda Tompkins

            Sounds like you have a biased opinion of where you live.

          • TMarius

            I imagine most immigrants to a country with cultural roots that extend back before Caesar went on campaign in Western Europe and that, by the third crusade, was already the military leader of Europe would feel like strangers, lol.

            Your monarch is the ceremonial head of state of 4 of the 5 Anglosphere countries, and ruled the greatest naval empire in the world. The English can bond over knowing their ancestors achieved all that, but what connection will an alien immigrant feel to that history?

            If a person moves from Poland to England, they may feel that by doing things the way they have always done them, they are perpetuating a strange culture in a country where identity is not an abstract idea at all, but something conferred at birth. That’s a recipe for wanderlust.

          • Béla Fekete

            Biased opinion ! hmm lets see now Picture this two white kids in an all white school, only they have a “Foreign Name” Theyhave parents who worked late to meet bills buy food etc and had to walk home the 3/4 of a mile from school. The two “foreign” white kids. were followed home from schol by a gang of 30-40 ENGLISH white kids and always thesame on the very last corner before they got home they were set on by thegang and beaten and this went on for months the Neighbours of the Foreign white kids knew what was going on but as it was only the bloody foreigners having the crap kicked out of them they did nothing. Well untill one day I got away leaving my sis to be beaten by the gang I ran home got the dogs and set the dogs on the scum beating on my sister. That’s when my wonderfull English neighbours did something they called the police to report me for setting the dogs on innocent English Kids !

            Ahh THE ENGLISH LIFE…
            And this bigotry and racism is what 90% of people from foreign lands will experience if they move to the UK …

          • TMarius

            England is an ancient nation with a similarly venerable culture. To be truly, fully English means you need to have been born and raised there.

            To be an American, all you need to do is uphold your oath to support and defend the Constitution and the freedoms and values enshrined within. That’s the beauty of this nation. We all started as immigrants arriving to an alien environment, and we all banded together under our values to create a national identity. Nobody should ever feel like they aren’t American. You aren’t born into the identity, you choose to embrace it.

            That’s coming from a guy born in D.C., by the way.

      • Béla Fekete
      • Niala Terrell-Mason

        Damn, that escalated quickly. You also sound like someone here, in America, who would rant about inner city “thugs.” The more things are different…the more they are the same. *eye roll*

      • TMarius

        Even our uneducated career street criminals have tons of ambition.

    • Kart180

      I know now why I can find any good American women. They all live back in England. I should married one when I got the chance. At living here in the states, every women says how charming my accent.

  • deedrdo

    to which american’s are you referring? there are north, central and south americans.

    • Anon

      Honest question: Do people from Canada, Guatemala, or Brazil ever refer to themselves as “Americans”?

      • deedrdo

        i was in Mexico and there was a soccer (football) game on the TV. both teams were from Mexico. one of the team’s name was the Americans. it was at that moment i realized what a bunch of self-involved and clueless citizens of the US we were. when someone asks me where i am from i say “United States” or “California.” i have found i get a much more positive reaction when i say i’m from California than i do when i say i’m from the United States.

        • dw

          I hope you remembered to specify “Alta” California [sarcasm].

          Whenever people from Mexico make this argument, I’m tempted to ask whether they know the official name of their own country. It’s “Estados Unidos Mexicanos”.

        • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

          Oh FFS! I really wish people would get over that stupid argument already. It was the British who first referred to the 13 colonies as America and the residents, Americans, and it stuck. They don’t call themselves Americans because they’re self-involved, they call themselves Americans because that’s the tradition! What I think is hilarious is how people like you spend so much of your time worrying about something so trivial and something that, whether you like it or not, will NEVER change!

          • frozen01

            I know I’m a little late to the game, but thank you (I am “Anon” above – I have no idea why but I can’t get the comments section on this site to use the same name for me – I have like four different handles on here, not even intending to).

        • frozen01

          So because one football team referred to themselves as “the Americans”, that means someone who (correctly) refers to themselves as “American” is self-involved and clueless? What are we supposed to call ourselves? Statesians? Citizens of the United States of America (because that’s not at all self-involved)?

          When someone asks me where I’m from, I say “the US” or “Illinois”, too, because saying “American” would be a grammatically-incorrect answer to that question :P

    • Lost In The Pond

      Not to mention, Mind The Gap is a blog for British expats living in the USA. It’s all in the context. :-)

  • jed_hoyer

    none of those are true.

  • Linda Tompkins

    What a load of garbage

    • Lost In The Pond

      Thank you. For me, however, these have been some fruitful benefits of marrying an American.

      • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

        And I think they’re pretty universal for expats marrying an American.

      • Linda Tompkins

        Glad you have found some benefits but the ones posted are mushy trash.

  • PAULA K. SCHMIDT

    Hey, I’m available! Dont even have to worry about the in-laws, they’re gone. I’m kind of scared of Brit men after the last time I checked Craigslist’s Men for Women section. Nothing but booty calls….:-(

  • Béla Fekete

    Shallow BS

  • Simon

    I’ve been in the USA around 4 months now … Biometrics on Tuesday. :o So, I really can’t comment on the above. I met my wife in Italy in 1985 when I was playing in a group touring US military bases. In 2011 she found a letter I had written to her, contacted me via Facebook and two years later I moved to the States to marry her. :)

  • Dawn

    My grandmother was a British ambulance driver in WW2 and she told me that she and her friends used to hang out in the American GI bars. That’s where she met my American grandfather. They moved to Michigan and raised six kids. She was outspoken, she fished, she was crafty, and she smoked skinny brown cigarettes.

    • TMarius

      Between 1941 and 1942 before we moved down to invade Sicily together, American GIs were being mustered in massive numbers in England (I think at one point they were even receiving basic training there).

      England became the most prized post of all despite the bombing, because the women A) had English accents, and B) preferred Americans to Englishmen for god-knows-what-reasons. The British GIs used to call them “Over-paid, Over-laid, and over-here”.

      Your grandfather sounds like one of the chivalrous ones. That or he was just nuts about your grandma, lol.

  • Ron Zelonis

    is an American that would love to marry a british lady :D

    • dw

      Looks like the singles site has already started! :)

  • Thom McCarthy

    Also, an American can recognize an article with the sole intent of generating subscriptions in the Colonies.

  • Sadly american and single

    I’d rather move to the UK if someone married me, but sadly not found anyone with citizenship wanting me. lol

  • Helen

    Don’t do it unless you want to stay in America. The UK have made it very difficult for expat and their families to return. If you have over 62000 pounds spare you will meet their criteria. Been married to my US spouse for eight years now we can’t move home with the kids because we would have to be separated for at least a year. Marry someone from the European union instead much easier!

  • dw

    The immigration thing is definitely true. I’ve seen many of my colleagues wait years and years to get a green card through work. The great advantages of doing it through marriage are:

    * you and your spouse, not your employer, are in charge of the process.

    * you don’t have to worry about a change in your job situation, or a sudden change in economic conditions (e.g. the 2008 financial crisis) delaying the process even longer.

  • Jen

    I am an American girl who dated an Englishman for a year. He broke up with me this week. Right before our two year anniversary. Do not fall in love, friends.

    • http://www.smittenbybritain.com/ SmittenbyBritain

      I’m sorry to hear that Jen.

    • http://www.heatherwiech.com/ Heather

      Aww *hugs* :(

  • Stephie

    I’m an American but my husband to be is Welsh. I think he does have a bit of fun with telling people I’m from America, but no where near as much fun as I have telling people my fiance is Welsh. Some of his friends did like to hear my accent (I’m from the South) He’s also very patriotic to his country so moving here wouldn’t really make the pro list for him. And to be honest I love the UK. I have a son from a previous marriage though so moving there isn’t a possibility.

  • NMRocks

    Gawd, puhleez don’t forget that the US does NOT have national healthcare. It’ll cost a small fortune unless you’re lucky enough to have good jobs. This American’s Brit boyfriend will never move to the US since he receives free healthcare in the UK.

  • Kate Sisil

    I have to agree with many of my fellow Americans. If I were to marry a Brit we would not be living here.I travel to the UK as often as I can. Going back to Scotland again later this year.

  • jason

    I’m actually marrying a Brit next week. We plan to live here in the US for now but also have plans to move back to the UK later. All countries have their issues but I live england and look forward to living there someday.

  • http://xiaochensu.blogspot.com/ Xiaochen Su

    all this article kinda does is make Americans feel good about themselves (not that I mind as a US citizen myself…but still)

  • Sarah

    I’m looking at you Benedict Cumberbatch.

  • Charlotte

    I met a lovely guy from New Jersey when I was on holiday in the U.S, – nicer than any guy I’ve met here in the UK. We still chat but unfortunately he lives too far away :(

  • jessica21

    In my dreams I marry a British man..

    • Kart180

      Accepting applications, Living in Florida right now, Originally from Surrey,England

      • jessica21

        lol

  • Amy Martin-Madeley

    I am American my husband is British. We met while he was studying abroad at my university, Baldwin Wallace University. Then I went to study abroad at his university, York St. John University. We applied for a fiance visa after we both graduated, he arrived in the US and we got married June 2010!

  • ‘Merica mike

    Just Stay outta Stockton, Oakland, Detroit, and Compton. And you’ll be fine.

    • Cal to Cymru

      False. Oakland is a beautiful city.

  • KG88

    Not surprised to see some comments from Americans wanting to live in the UK–it is very appealing–but as a Californian who lived in Wales for 5 years, the weather is really just not worth it. It is cold, grey, rainy, and miserable about 355 days/year, and it turns everyone in the country miserable. Don’t get me wrong, Britain is beautiful to look at and the people are fun to be around (that is if you can understand them… i.e. Northerners) but let’s try not to put all our eggs in one basket now. There’s only so much you can do in the UK without getting completely soaked or frozen stiff in the process. Britain is green. It has Europe and healthcare. But America has variety and it offers a much better lifestyle than Britain can offer to most of its people.

    As an American I love Wales, Britain, the accents, the footy, and the people… but I am so happy my Welsh husband is obsessed with California living so I can relax in my bikini all winter and not with 8 blankets and a hot water bottle. Okay, that may be a bit of an exaggeration.

    On a side note though–this article was a complete disappointment. I was hoping to see more of an emphasis (or generalization) on Americans vs Brits, and not the benefits of marrying to live in a different country. Rub. Bish.

    • frozen01

      Well, it’s hard to compete with California weather! We just “escaped” the most miserable winter in recorded history here in Chicago, and spent the majority of it watching the weather in Manchester (the area my other half is from) with dismay because it was, on average, about 40 degrees F warmer! :S

      It’s funny what you said about not being able to understand Northerners. It’s east Londoners I can’t understand to save my life! ;)

  • Evie Prescott

    I have nothing against British people.I wonder if my now ex husband is a Chav? First time I’ve ever heard the phrase. Cheating lying green card marrying conman. I fell for the accent. He grew up in Rhyl, Wales.He is still in the US because he had a few kids with the woman he cheated with. Found out he had more in England than he told me about. Either way I now watch and love Dr. Who and countless other British TV. From traveling I have felt that most British people do not like Americans or are annoyed by us.

    • http://www.babybeastboutique.etsy.com Renita Lynn Thomas

      Sorry but the majority of Brits that I have met and have known for the past 15 years do not have a issue with “Americans” they have a issue with the people in office, just as we do.

    • KG88

      I can see why you’d think that, but I think overall Brits are annoyed with people. Welsh/Scottish/Irish hate the English. English hate the foreigners (note: just making an observation). It just comes from deep national pride in my opinion. Sorry to hear about that scumbag but it sounds like you’re much better off! Rhyl is a sh–hole anyways ;)

    • KG88

      Oh and the term “chav” is actually a derogatory word for lower class and antisocial youths. Kind of the equivalent to “ghetto”.

      • Evie Prescott

        Thank you KG88. I wouldnt call him antisocial. He will be 40 this year and Im sure is up to his same cheating, lying and mooching ways. I would not doubt based off of the definition of a Chav that he was one in his youth and didn’t grow out of it. Either way I am better off. Based on the above article just would be surprised that the British friends would be impressed that you landed an American due to British pride.

    • Kart180

      No true Evie, I love American people but every time I speak, They have not clue what I am on about. Chav is more associated with council estate and lower class people.

  • EmmaK

    Ah so romantic! Did you ever see Green Card? Are you a dead ringer for Gerard Depardieu?

  • http://www.babybeastboutique.etsy.com Renita Lynn Thomas

    My husband and I married in 2002, he is from Newport Wales, UK, I’m from USA. We have had our struggles but with each struggle they have brought us closer as a couple. Regardless of living in the USA or UK both countries has its pro’s and con’s. As long as we are together.

  • Annie Blankenship

    Currently accepting applications for a British husband ;-)

    • Kart180

      Where can I apply, Living in the states but Surrey born and breed :)

  • micmic

    please note their is no brit it is English. wales and Scotland are separate it is only them who use union jack we use our own flag

    • KG88

      As long as you own a British passport and/or driver license, to the world you will always be British.

    • dw

      England has its own flag too. And I’m afraid that Wales has been effectively united with England for over seven hundred years.

  • micmic

    please note their is no brit. they are English. we welsh and the scots have no desire to be connected to them

    • dw

      The results of the 1979 and 1997 referendums speak otherwise.

  • Tamara Benson

    I met my husband while studying and traveling in the UK. He lived in Holyhead, North Wales and we dated via internet and phone for a few months before he invited me to visit him and his family when I was in London. We have been married for 6 years in May and live in Ohio now to be closer to my family. I would have loved to stay in the UK, but I teach University English and couldn’t in Wales because I don’t speak the language. Coming home meant a guaranteed job for me. He loves it here though and wouldn’t move back.

  • Kart180

    As a Brit who lived his whole life in the UK (Surrey), I would love to marry an American women and settle down here. Anywhere on the west coast like Oregon or on the east coast in New England or North Carolina

    • Katherine Kelley

      North Carolina? I have to ask why, exactly, do you find it appealing? I have lived here all my life and fail to see the appeal for the most part. The beaches and mountains are lovely if you are outdoorsy (which I am, and I enjoy them), but the education system is not good, and growth is unchecked resulting in a sprawling mess in the cities and then rampant poverty in rural areas.

      • Kart180

        The education system is not good. NC does seen nice because of the mountains. I do also prefer Cali or anywhere outside the southern states