Hattie Lemaster

Hattie Lemaster, a former slave, recently arrived to Five Points to start anew with her daughter Sara Freeman. Jarred by raucous city life, Hattie must learn what the true meaning of “freedom” is in the North.

About Alfre Woodard

Alfre Woodard’s work as an actor has earned her an Oscar nomination, four Emmy Awards and 16 Emmy nominations, three SAG Awards and a Golden Globe. Woodard also enjoys philanthropic work and currently serves on the National Film Preservation Foundation Board, as well as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences International Outreach Committee.

Woodard’s illustrious body of work includes her Oscar nominated performance in Martin Ritt’s Cross Creek; HBO’s Mandela, where she was honored with an ACE award for her portrayal of Winnie Mandela; Lawrence Kasdan’s Grand Canyon; John Sayles’ Passion Fish; Joseph Sargent’s Miss Evers' Boys, for which she won an Emmy, SAG and Golden Globe Award; Spike Lee’s Crooklyn; Gina Prince-Bythewood’s Love and Basketball; Tyler Perry’s The Family That Preys; Maya Angelou’s Down in the Delta; and played Betty Applewhite on the ABC drama Desperate Housewives.

Most recently, Woodard co-starred Lifetime’s hit remake of Steel Magnolias in which she was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award and won a NAACP Image Award for her performance as Ouiser and will be reprising her role as Ruby Jean Reynolds, mother to Lafayette Reynolds, on HBO’s megahit True Blood. She will also be seen next in the upcoming film Twelve Years a Slave, directed by Steve McQueen and starring Brad Pitt.

In addition to her acting career, Woodard is a longtime activist, currently serving on The Creative Coalition, as well as co-founding “Artists for a New South Africa,” a non-profit working to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS, and further the cause of Democracy and Human rights in South Africa. In 2008, Woodard served as a national surrogate for the 2008 Obama presidential campaign, and in 2009, was appointed by President Barack Obama to the "President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities."

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