This browser is supported only in Windows 10 and above.

Jason Isaacs is one of our favorite actors, with memorable roles in Harry Potter, The OA, Star Trek and now Death of Stalin, which opened Friday (March 9).

Such success doesn’t necessarily translate into worldwide fame, however, something that hasn’t gone unnoticed by Jason himself. In a wide-ranging interview with The Guardian yesterday (March 11), he admitted his career hadn’t had the stratospheric rise he’d hoped it would.

“Sometimes I wish I was more famous,” he said. “You have more choices as an actor when you are.”

Jason then went on to play down his celebrity, describing himself as “just a dude who forgets to take out the rubbish,” before appraising his career in equally humble terms.

“I’ve had a good year or two, but there have been other times… I’ve been to Sundance with eight films, and only one of them came out.”

And while Jason has in recent years quietly gone on to become a big name in TV and film, it almost didn’t happen. In 2003, he played the twin roles of Mr. Darling and Captain Hook in director P.J. Hogan‘s take on Peter Pan, a casting that was supposed to break him as a massive star.

“When I was in Peter Pan,” he explained, “it was going to be gigantic. I was told it would change my life. Be careful, they said; make sure you’ve got the right people in place. Then it came out, and it was a catastrophic flop.”

He continued: “It killed my film career stone dead for a while.”

He went on to say he got the most out of the situation, however. “It was a great lesson. Just have a great time and do the best you can.”

We’d agree with that, for sure. And with that in mind, let’s focus on the positives: Jason has two films due out this year, including Look Away with Mira Sorvino and Hotel Mumbai alongside Dev Patel and Armie Hammer. We can also look for him in the second season of The OA and (fingers crossed) Star Trek: Discovery.

Do you agree with Jason’s assessment of his career so far?

Read More
Filed Under: Jason Isaacs
By Kat Sommers
Kat is a freelance writer for Anglophenia.