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Tatiana Laslany accepts the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. (Photo: Getty Images)

We knew she was outstanding, you knew she was outstanding, and finally the Emmys have agreed: BBC America’s own Tatiana Maslany was named Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series last night (September 18) at the Emmy Awards 2016.

“Meltdown” doesn’t quite cover what followed next on social media, as Clone Club went into overdrive and everyone, from Tatiana’s co-stars to her fellow actors, got a tad emotional, including at least one Oscar winner:

https://twitter.com/brielarson/status/777717578168885248

One of the most memorable moments of the night happened as Tatiana took to the stage, and her friends started hitting up her phone, right as she was reading her acceptance speech off of it.

Tatiana won for her role—or should we say roles—in Orphan Black, beating off stiff competition from the likes of Claire Danes (Homeland), Viola Davis (How to Get Away with Murder), Taraji P. Henson (Empire), Keri Russell (The Americans), and Robin Wright (House of Cards).

Anglo favorite Sherlock won Outstanding Television Movie for its one-off special “The Abominable Bride,” and though Tom Hiddleston missed out on an award for his role in The Night Manager, he presented the award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special to Susanne Bier, the show’s director.

Here he is arriving on stage with Priyanka Chopra:

That’s right. Repeat after us: Taylor who?

(Seriously, guys – the new hashtag is #hiddlechops. Please update your diaries.)

Last night’s ceremony was also hailed for its diversity, with host Jimmy Kimmel making several references to the representation of a plurality of identities among winners in light of the “Oscars So White” controversy earlier this year.

Rami Malek became the first non-white actor in 18 years to win Best Lead Actor in a Drama when he won for his performance as Elliot Alderson, a paranoid, socially awkward hacker in Mr. Robot, holding off competition from actors including bookie’ favorite Kevin Spacey, who was nominated for House of Cards, The Americans star Matthew Rhys and Better Call Saul star Bob Odenkirk.

And while Veep won the Best Comedy Series award for the second year running, Alan Yang and Aziz Ansari nabbed an Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series for their series Master of None.

Courtney B. Vance also came out on top in a very strong field, beating Tom Hiddleston, Idris Elba, Benedict Cumberbatch, Cuba Gooding Jr. and Bryan Cranston to win Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie for his portrayal of lawyer Johnnie Cochran in The People vs O.J. Simpson.

Ryan Murphy‘s dramatization of the O.J. Simpson trial had a great night, having picked up 22 nominations and winning the gong for Outstanding Limited Series, while actors Sterling K. Brown and Sarah Paulson also picked up individual honors for their performances as Christopher Darden and Marcia Clark respectively.

The big winner of the night, though, was undoubtedly Game of Thrones, which won 12 awards and broke the record set by the sitcom Frasier by bringing their total haul of Emmys to 38.

A rare let-up in the fantasy epic’s dominance came with the award for Outstanding Support Actress in a Drama Series, however. Not one, not two, but three Game of Thrones actresses (Maisie Williams, Emilia Clarke, and Lena Headley) had been nominated, but in the end it went to one Dame Maggie Smith for her role as Downton Abbey‘s irascible Dowager Countess.

In true Violet Crawley form, and for the ninth time since her first Emmy nomination in 1993, the 81-year-old actress was not at the ceremony to collect her award. Instead Kimmel crashed the stage to commandeer her trophy when her win was announced.

“No, no, no, no, no,” he said. “We’re not mailing this to her. Maggie, if you want this, it’ll be in the lost and found.”

…we think they might be in for a long wait.

You can read the winners in full here.

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By Kat Sommers
Kat is a freelance writer for Anglophenia.