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Dr. Adam Rutherford swabs a Dalek (Photo: BBC)

Welcome to the Doctor Who’s Day roundup, a swift smash ‘n’ grab of a week’s worth of Whovian stuff (and nonsense), wrapped up in handy blog form.

And we begin this week with a story that really should’ve been front page news all over the universe.

There’s a Dalek in the main foyer of the BBC’s Broadcasting House in London, and it was recently the subject of a curious experiment to try and locate bacteria that could assist scientists in developing new ways to deal with antibiotic-resistent “superbugs”, thereby helping to heal thousands of potentially lethal infections.

In a report for the BBC Radio 4 show Inside Science, Dr. Adam Rutherford explained that scientists are on the hunt for as many microbes as possible (part of an initiative called “Swab and Send”) to try and locate bacteria that would attack infection. And to illustrate this, he took swabs from various areas of the building, including the Dalek’s eye stalk.

Although the rest of Broadcasting House proved to be a less than fertile breeding ground for life-saving bacteria, there was a startling result when the Dalek swabs were analyzed, as this clip illustrates:

Davros is going to be SO CROSS when he finds out about this.

Here’s what else has been going on in space and time this week:

Facts about what is going to happen in Season 10 have been fairly thin on the ground recently. So far the only thing we know for sure that the Doctor meets a new friend called Bill (Pearl Mackie), and introduces her to some Daleks. However, it was announced today that Matt Lucas will be making a return to the show from the beginning of Season 10, to play Nardole former hapless assistant to River Song.

Steven Moffat said he is “delighted and slightly amazed to be welcoming Matt Lucas back on to the TARDIS – and this time it’s not just for Christmas, he’s sticking around. One of the greatest comedy talents on planet Earth is being unleashed on all of time and space.”

Also returning as a writer in Season 10 will be Frank Cottrell-Boyce, who gave us “In The Forest of the Night” and Sarah Dollard (“Face the Raven”). New faces include the acclaimed actress Stephanie Hyam (Peaky Blinders, Sherlock, Jekyll & Hyde), and award-winning writer Mike Bartlett (Doctor Foster).

• Interesting Class news:

• Time to catch up with an old friend.

• This is wonderful:

Karen Gillan experiences fame’s hollow side:

This is me holding a balloon version of myself. Which is, as it turns out, a strange sensation.

A photo posted by Karen Gillan (@karengillanofficial) on

• “Are you sitting comfortably? Then we’ll begin”

• The Third Doctor returns, in comic book form:

• Half man, half Zygon:

• This would not be a bad idea…

• Whoever the Doctor is, he’s always good with children:

• A dramatic flash of crimson:

"Sometimes the right path, is not the easiest one" by @giusylanzafamee #DoctorWho

A photo posted by Doctor Who (@doctorwho_bbca) on

• When fandoms collide: Missy and Stan Lee:

• “Say something nice…”

• The Doctor Who ultimate fan quiz has grown bigger:

• Is anyone else worried that there’s a Dalek on the loose?

Jenna Coleman crosses the road… as Queen Victoria:

Waiting for the green man 🚦@daisygeorgiatraill #victoria

A photo posted by Jenna Coleman (@jenna_coleman_) on

• Plenty of familiar faces in this Lego Dimensions trailer, and a big blue box:

And finally, let’s go out on a tangent. There were two Doctor Who movies made in the 1960s that starred Peter Cushing as an old professor called the Doctor, who had a granddaughter called Susan and who battled against evil aliens called Daleks (and included a character played by Bernard Cribbins, the future Wilfred Mott!). A lot of the elements of the First Doctor era were in place, but by no means all, so while they are full color extravaganzas, these films have taken on a less significant role compared to the canon of the TV show over the years. Here’s a nice fan-made trailer to give you a taste:

TTFN!

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By Fraser McAlpine