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You’d expect the land that gave the fashion world everything from Saville Row tailoring to the punk revolution would produce a pretty diverse range of clothing, and you’d be right. Season after season, London designers send everything from three-piece suits to
oversize plywood headpieces down the runway, and the fall 2016 shows during London Collections: Men were no different.

In fact, the dualities of British style have rarely been thrown into sharper relief. Some shows felt distinctly like watching young kids tumble out of nightclubs in the wee hours of the morning; others looked like a tony gathering of old friends from public school.

So what about the style-conscious guy in the middle of those two extremes? Below, we offer 16 looks that split the difference.

Burberry

(Photo: Burberry)
(Photo: Burberry)

The biggest strength at London’s largest house is its outerwear—after all, this is the company that gave the world the trench coat. Its creative director Christopher Bailey put plenty of great coats and jackets on top of sharply tailored athletic gear and trainers.

Topman Design

(Photo: Topman Design)
(Photo: Topman Design)

The higher end line of the high-street staple store presented a lot of highly decorated velour suiting. But we’re willing to bet more guys will go for the oversize washed denim pieces shown alongside their more flamboyant cousins.

E. Tautz

(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)
(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)

Designer Patrick Grant—who runs another Saville Row operation, Norton & Sons—went back to the ’80s in the best way possible: the tailoring here was generously cut, soft shouldered, and really easy to layer.

Lou Dalton

(Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images)

If three makes a trend, Lou Dalton has certified that the oversize look is in. Here, the designer has applied it with a charming effect to a navy blue fleece jacket and khaki trousers, two things that should be in every man’s closet.

Alexander McQueen

(Photo: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)
(Photo: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

Embroidered butterflies adorned many of the looks Team McQueen sent down the runway, but this double-breasted jacket proved the pieces work just as well without the winged decoration.

Pringle of Scotland

(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)
(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)

Pringle’s Massimo Nicosia keeps iterating and innovating on one of the 200-year-old brand’s old standards: the check. The appeal of this collection’s sweaters is that you have to get up close to see the craft behind them, which will literally draw people in this fall.

Dunhill

(Photo: Dunhill)
(Photo: Dunhill)

Dunhill’s John Ray trotted out an assortment of the house’s very richest looks—and we mean that figuratively and literally. The collection encourages investing in long-lasting classics.

Belstaff

(Photo: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)
(Photo: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

Belstaff is best-known as a motorcycling brand, so this assortment was full of the kinds of clothes you’d want if you were riding your bike through the tundra—or simply making your way from home to the office in the freezing cold rain.

Richard James

(Photo: Luca Teuchmann/Getty Images)
(Photo: Luca Teuchmann/Getty Images)

Lots of London designers showed turtlenecks this season, but none looked quite as elegant as this one from Saville Row house Richard James. The styling proves it’s an easy thing to pair with that most important of wardrobe staples, denim.

Matthew Miller

(Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images)

This shearling jacket from Matthew Miller, with both sides of the hide rendered in a gentle gray instead of the white-and-brown combination, makes the tough winter outerwear alternative feel gentler.

Casely-Hayford

(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)
(Photo: Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images)

The father-son design team at Casely-Hayford have made their brand a part of the menswear conversation by turning up the volume on pieces guys already love to wear. Case in point: tailored sweats accented with a businesslike cuff at the hem and the kind of permanent crease tailors dream about.

Joseph

(Photo: Joseph)
(Photo: Joseph)

At Joseph, designer Louise Trotter is also merging sportswear and tailoring. Instead of your standard herringbone wool trousers, Trotter created a pair that look like sweatpants, complete with an elastic cuff.

Christopher Raeburn

(Photo: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)
(Photo: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)

Kent native Christopher Raeburn is getting behind the appeal of layering outerwear. His latest collection featured a few pieces (like this elongated hoodie and the parka worn over it) that look like they were designed to be worn together.

Gieves & Hawkes

(Photo: Gieves & Hawkes)
(Photo: Gieves & Hawkes)

A brand whose headquarters are located at No. 1 Saville Row doesn’t need to make a fantastic pair of jeans. But Gieves & Hawkes proves in this look that it can excel at dressing guys regardless of what they want to wear.

Kilgour

(Photo: Kilgour)
(Photo: Kilgour)

Down the street at 5 Saville Row, Kilgour’s master tailors work with denim, too. But the focus is on their clean-lined and futuristic suiting, much of which features a shawl collar that stands straight up.

Margaret Howell

(Photo: Luca Teuchmann/Getty Images)
(Photo: Luca Teuchmann/Getty Images)

The biggest fashion prediction in Spike Jonze’s movie Her is men in high-waisted trousers. Jonze might have been onto something. The slacks in Margaret Howell’s collection stretched for the navel but didn’t look at all out of place in the context of solid knitwear and sober outerwear.

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By Justin Fenner