This browser is supported only in Windows 10 and above.
Steven Moffat and Sue Vertue at the SherlockeDCC event. (Photo: Monica Reyhani/BBC AMERICA)
Steven Moffat and Sue Vertue at the SherlockeDCC event. (Photo: Monica Reyhani/BBC AMERICA)
Steven Moffat and Sue Vertue at the SherlockeDCC event. (Photo: Monica Reyhani/BBC AMERICA)

Don’t worry about Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss running out of source material, Sherlock fans.

It’s a question that comes up frequently in chats with the Sherlock creators, and the query was raised twice when Moffat and wife/series producer Sue Vertue appeared at the Baker Street Babes’ annual SherlockeDCC event held during San Diego Comic-Con on Friday (July 10). What will happen when the writers finally exhaust all of Arthur Conan Doyle‘s stories?

“At this stage, given that there is so much original, and we make the show like the glacier that advances across Europe, we’re not in any real danger of running out,” said Moffat, before quipping, “I think Arthur Conan Doyle could catch up with us and he’s dead.”

“He wrote 60 of them, we’ve made 10.”

As we’re all aware, the makers of Sherlock, including stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, are in high demand, and production must be scheduled around their busy careers. With three episodes typically happening over the course of a year or two, the chances of the team eating through all of Doyle’s stories are slim, as Moffat said.

But he did pose a hypothetical: “In the event that all of our other careers failed,” he said, “and we were making loads of Sherlock every year in desperation, we would generate new stories. We very rarely, as you know, accurately and faithfully adapt the story. We make a new story out of an old one… In effect, we make a new story, and we are happy to do so and would continue to do so. In the event by some miracle, we happened to use up all of the 60 stories, let’s be honest, do you know how old we would be?”

See more:
WATCH: Sneak Peek at Sherlock’s Victorian Special

Read More
By Kevin Wicks
Kevin Wicks is the founding editor of Anglophenia.