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Christopher Nolan has that professor vibe, but alas it's not a package deal. (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/2015 Tribeca Film Festival)
Christopher Nolan has that professor vibe, but alas it's not a package deal. (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/2015 Tribeca Film Festival)
Christopher Nolan has that professor vibe, but alas it’s not a package deal. (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/2015 Tribeca Film Festival)

It’s one thing to make a sci-fi film that connects with a broad audience, but you know you’ve hit the mark when the science community backs you up.

That’s what’s happening with director Christopher Nolan’s time-bending Interstellar.

The American Journal of Physics has published an academic paper entitled “Visualizing ‘Interstellar’s Wormhole,” and based on its findings is suggesting the film be used as a learning tool for physics students studying general relativity, reports BBC News.

The paper tips its hat to the realistic graphics used in depicting wormholes and black holes in the film, saying the film is “an opportunity to bring realistic wormholes and black holes into the Hollywood arena but also an opportunity to create images of wormholes and black holes for relativity and astrophysics research.”

Christopher Nolan talks about the science behind the film in the below clip:

Interstellar stars Anglo fan favorite Michael Caine and American actors Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway.

If you haven’t already seen Interstellar, or just want to re-watch it, the movie is available on Amazon Instant.

Do you think students will be keen on the idea of watching a movie at school?

See More: 
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10 Sci-Fi Franchises Influenced by ‘Doctor Who’
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By Brigid Brown