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Dr. Lynne Murphy during her TedXSussexUniversity talk in 2012. (tedxsussexuniversity.com)
Dr. Lynne Murphy during her TedXSussexUniversity talk in 2012. (tedxsussexuniversity.com)
Dr. Lynne Murphy during her ‘TedXSussexUniversity’ talk in 2012. (tedxsussexuniversity.com)

American linguist Lynne Murphy explains her title of “Reader” in Linguistics and English Language at the University of Sussex as the U.S. equivalent of a “professor.” Lynne also operates the blog Separated by a Common Language, where she makes “observations on British and American English by an American linguist in the U.K.”

To clear up any language confusion between Brits and Americans, Lynne joined us Wednesday (November 13) for a @MindtheGap_BBCA #MindTheChat Twitter gathering on discerning linguistic differences across the pond.

 

Let’s check out what Lynne and others had to say concerning UK and US semantic deviations:

 

What British words worry, astound, or intrigue Americans?

 

How do American speech models affect expats?

 

What do Brits shun concerning American English?

 

Lynne had a lot of comprehensive guidance for #MindTheChat participants covering The Economist, the terms “alright” and “iffy,” laundry detergent, cows, school, and more:

 

For more linguistic knowledge, check out Lynne’s Twitter for her “Difference of the Day” and her blog for regular language posts. Also, check out her awesome TedxSussexUniversity talk!

Join @MindTheGap_BBCA on Twitter every Wednesday from 2 to 3 pm ET for a Q&A using hashtag #MindTheChat.

 

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By Helen Donahue