WATCH: Arthur Darvill on ‘Once,’ Why He Loves New York, and Performing at the Tonys

Arthur Darvill in the BBC AMERICA studio. (Photo: Dave Gustav Anderson)

Arthur Darvill in the BBC AMERICA studio. (Photo: Dave Gustav Anderson)

Arthur Darvill has never been more in demand as an actor. Call it the Doctor Who effect. On that landmark, 50-year-old sci-fi series, Darvill played the bumbling yet surprisingly heroic Rory Williams opposite on-screen bride Karen Gillan and show lead Matt Smith. Gillan and Darvill both left in 2012, with Smith announcing his departure a few months ago. (Check out our interview with Darvill about Matt’s decision.)

Leaving a solid, dependable franchise can be daunting, but all three are making seamless transitions to life after Who. Gillan and Smith both shaved their heads for high-profile movie gigs, while Darvill has nabbed roles in the British miniseries The Paradise and The White Queen, as well as a part as a man of the cloth on the suspenseful and acclaimed ensemble drama Broadchurch, which makes its BBC AMERICA bow tonight (August 7) at 10/9c.

Now the actor/singer/guitarist made his way from Broadchurch to Broadway, starring as an Irish songwriter who makes a chance connection with a Czech woman (Joanna Christie) in the Tony-winning Once the Musical.

BBC AMERICA recently chatted with Darvill about why he hasn’t done many musicals before, why New Yorkers have it pretty good, and what it was like performing at the Tony Awards in front of star-studded audience. Watch the interview below.

Arthur on auditioning for Once

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Arthur on living in New York for a year

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Arthur on performing at the Tonys

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Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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