Memorize the Last 1000 Years of Monarchs with a Song

Royal Jubilee preparations. Embargoed to 0001 Sunday May 27. Royal Collection Curator Caroline de Guitaut holds the Diamond Diadem, crown familiar to millions after being worn by the Queen on postage stamps, which is to go on display at Buckingham Palace, London. Picture date: Tuesday May 15, 2012. The Diamond Diadem, which has been worn by the Queen on her journey to and from the state opening of Parliament since the first year of her reign, will be part of an exhibition to celebrate her 60 years on the throne. Diamonds: A Jubilee Celebration will show the many ways in which the jewels have been worn by British monarchs over the last two centuries. The exhibition includes a number of the Queen's personal jewels, which she inherited or acquired during her reign. The Diamond Diadem is one of the Queen's most widely recognised pieces of jewellery and can also be seen on some banknotes and coins. See PA story ROYAL Diadem. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire URN:13620606 (Press Association via AP Images)

Royal Collection Curator Caroline de Guitaut holds the Diamond Diadem, crown familiar to millions after being worn by the Queen on postage stamps, which is to go on display at Buckingham Palace. It has been worn by the Queen on her journey to and from the state opening of Parliament since the first year of her reign. (Press Association via AP Images)

Since the announcement of the royal birth, line of succession to the throne has been in the limelight. (At the center of focus was the change in succession laws, which now states that an older girl cannot be dropped down in line to the throne in place of a younger brother. The child of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William was to be third in line to the British throne whether or not the baby had been a boy or girl.) Currently, the immediate line of succession goes as follows: Prince Charles, Prince William, and then Prince George.

While the laws of succession can be somewhat confusing, remembering the British monarchs of the past 1,000 years in chronological order can be even more difficult. So, here’s a helpful mnemonic device often used in British schools to keep track of the British Monarchs from William the Conqueror forward.

Willie, Willie, Harry, Ste,
Harry, Dick, John, Harry three;
One two three Neds, Richard two,
Harrys four five six, … then who?
Edwards four five, Dick the bad,
Harrys (twain), Ned (the lad);
Mary, Bessie, James the vain,
Charlie, Charlie, James again.
Will and Mary, Anna Gloria,
Georges four, then Will, Victoria;
Edward seven, George and Ted,
George the sixth, now Liz instead.

Translated into proper names, the line goes: William I, William II, Henry I, Stephen, Henry II, Richard I, John, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Edward IV, Edward V, Richard III, Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, Elizabeth, James I (& VI of Scotland), Charles I, Charles II, James II, William III and Mary II, Anne, George I, George II, George III, George IV, William IV, Victoria, Edward VII, George V, Edward VIII, George VI, and Elizabeth II.

Do you know any other handy Brit culture/history mnemonic devices ?