Royal Roundup: The Queen Would ‘Like Very Much’ for Royal Baby to Arrive Before She Goes on Holiday

Queen Elizabeth II talks to school children from Wiggonby Church of England School as she arrives in Brockhole, Windermere, Cumbria. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II talks to school children from Wiggonby Church of England School as she arrives in Brockhole, Windermere, Cumbria. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II seems to be on the edge of her seat awaiting the royal birth, much like the rest of Britain and the world. On a trip to Lake Windermere recently, a 10-year-old student asked Queen Elizabeth II whether she would like for the royal child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to be a girl or a boy. She answered the young student, Fay Batey, “I don’t think I mind. I would very much like it to arrive. I’m going on holiday,” reports BBC. More photos from her visit can be seen below.

Crowds gather at the pier for the arrival of Queen Elizabeth II on Windermere pier. (Press Association via AP Images)

Crowds gather at the pier for the arrival of Queen Elizabeth II on Windermere pier, Cumbria. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II accompanied by Bill Bewley, Chairman of Windermere Lake Cruises arrives at Bowness on Windermere pier, Cumbria. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II accompanied by Bill Bewley, Chairman of Windermere Lake Cruises arrives at Bowness on Windermere pier. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II is presented with a posy of flowers by Daniel Dixon, aged six, from St Mary's Primary School Windermere, as she arrives at Bowness on Windermere pier, Cumbria. (Press Association via AP Images)

Queen Elizabeth II is presented with a posy of flowers by Daniel Dixon, aged six, from St Mary’s Primary School Windermere. (Press Association via AP Images)

  • It seems that a large number of expectant mothers in the U.K. are postponing naming their children in order to await the royal birth. Many intend to name their children the same name as the heir to the British throne, mentions E! Online. In England, parents may wait up to six weeks after the birth of their child to officially name the baby.
  • Prince Charles is expected to be an involved and enthusiastic grandfather, discusses Today. He has often spoken about what a “magical grandmother” the Duchess of York was to him throughout his lifetime, and it seems he hopes to be just as present in his grandchild’s life as both his grandmother was to him and Queen Elizabeth II is to her grandchildren.
  • Were you aware that titled members of the royal family do not have surnames? Or perhaps that Queen Victoria was the first royal to use anesthesia in childbirth? Expand your knowledge on both of those facts as well as others in CNN’s article “Royal Babies: 5 Things You Didn’t Know.
  • CNN looks at how a female royal child might modernize the monarchy, particularly in light of the recent legislation which has removed the tradition of male primogeniture. They also discuss the popularity of the few Queens in the past thousand years of the English monarchy, especially Queen Elizabeth II.