Idris Elba Earns His Stripes on Cover of British GQ

Idris Elba embodies a sort of panache that’s beyond the grasp of most mortals, so it’s no wonder that British GQ recruited the Luther star to cover their “Cool List” issue for March. Sporting Marlon Brando‘s biker duds from “The Wild One,” Idris shows off his playful side in this snap.

And just for those who find Elba’s brooding John Luther persona most appealing, savor this:

Motorcycle sexiness: Idris Elba in his British GQ spread. (Photo via GQ)

For an actor who seems to wield his sexuality effortlessly, Elba is candid about his own insecurities in his GQ interview: “The irony is I wake up every morning, look at myself in the mirror and think, ‘Woah, I look like a piece of s***.’ You watch yourself age and it’s hard to feel like a sex symbol.”

However, Elba is acutely aware of the heat he’s generating in his film and TV roles, including last year’s Prometheus and the upcoming Pacific Rim. Speaking about the female attention he’s received, “It’s a compliment and it’s a massive tool to use in sculpting a career, especially with what I do for a living because I work in the face business. So it’s a compliment and I use it accordingly.”

Meanwhile, Elba talks of directing and starring in a recent Mumford and Sons video and his longtime love for DJ’ing: “I’m at a massive crossroads at the moment. Whether it’s music or acting, that creativity all comes from the same source. It’s a bit like if you work out your arms or your abs too much, your legs get skinny. You need to exercise them all at the same time…”

What do you think of Elba’s cover? Tell us below:

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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