‘Doctor Who’s Day Roundup: Assembling The Doctors

The First Eight Doctors

Exciting news! Five of the Doctor’s former incarnations have signed up to appear in a new Who story, in which past incarnations of the traveling Time Lord meet up, written to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the show. But don’t worry if you think this is a plot-spoiler for the TV delights coming in November, it’s an audiobook.

Big Finish have announced the release of Doctor Who: The Light at the End, a 100-minute long audiobook starring Peter DavisonTom BakerColin BakerSylvester McCoy and Paul McGann as the Doctor (5), the Doctor (4), the Doctor (6), the Doctor (7) and the Doctor (8) respectively.

Nicholas Briggs, who wrote and directed it, says “We wanted to do a proper, fully-fledged multi-Doctor story for this very special occasion, and it’s wonderful that all the surviving classic Doctors threw themselves behind the project so enthusiastically. That’s not to say the first three Doctors don’t appear – we wanted to pay homage to the whole history of the classic series.”

There are also appearances from (deep breath) Louise Jameson (Leela), Sarah Sutton (Nyssa), Nicola Bryant (Peri), Sophie Aldred (Ace) and India Fisher as the Edwardian adventurer Charley Pollard.

Here’s what else is going on in space and time this week:

• This looks like it’ll be well worth keeping up with:

• The Doctor Who website pulled together a retrospective collection of information about the Great Intelligence, so new Whovians (newvians?) who have only just discovered one of the Doctor’s oldest (but not often revisited) foes, can find out what went on before.

• At the advance screening of The Snowmen in London, last year, Matt Smith and Jenna-Louise Coleman very graciously took part in a Q&A. This is what happened:

Eoin Colfer, author of the first of this year’s new Doctor Who e-books, A Big Hand for the Doctor, wrote his own variation on the #newtoWho thing we were exploring a while back, for the Guardian.

And here’s a sample of the book

And Eoin himself, talking about writing it:

• Do you ever find yourself wondering what it would look like if the TARDIS was the DeLorean from Back To The Future? Wonder no more:

• A familiar face is back on American television: Freema Agyeman, formerly our own Dr. Martha Jones, has a prominent role in The Carrie Diaries, CW’s 1980s-set prequel to the hit HBO comedy Sex and the City. On the series, Freema plays Marissa, a fabulous woman-about-town and mentor to the young Carrie Bradshaw (AnnaSophia Robb). Click here for an interview, and check out Agyeman’s fierce Reagan-era duds below. Did you catch the premiere last night?

Freema Agyeman in ‘The Carrie Diaries’ (Photo: Mathieu Young/The CW)

• The career of Delia Derbyshire, the musical pioneer who recorded the original Doctor Who theme – one of the landmark recordings in the development of electronic music – was celebrated in Manchester over the weekend. Delia Derbyshire Day featured a performance from a sort of tribute act called the Delia Darlings, using sound footage made by Delia herself, as well as a showing of the award-winning film The Delian Mode.

• The British Film Institute is running a year-long celebration of all things Who, at their headquarters on London’s South Bank. They’ll be paying special tribute to each Doctor, one for every month of the year leading up to November, as they go. Here are some more details, if you should happen to be in the neighborhood.

TTFN!

Fraser McAlpine

Fraser has been writing and broadcasting about music and popular culture for over 15 years, first at the Top of the Pops website, and most recently for the NME, Guardian and MSN. He also wrote BBC Radio 1's Chart Blog and reviews albums for BBC Radio 2.

He is Anglophenia's current resident Brit, blogging about British slang and running around the Mall taking snaps of the crowd at the Royal Wedding, as well as reigniting a childhood passion for classic Doctor Who and cramming as much music in as he can manage.

Fraser invites you to join him on Twitter: @csi_popmusic

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