The ‘Special Relationship’ – A History of Meetings Between British Monarchs and U.S. Presidents

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GEORGE H.W. BUSH AND ELIZABETH II

President George H.W. Bush tossing a horseshoe with the Queen at the White House, May 14, 1991. (Barry Thumma/AP Images)

When the Queen visited Washington DC in May 1991, shortly after the Gulf War, President George H. W. Bush remarked that ever since Elizabeth had “joined the war against fascism” as a young princess helping in Britain’s World War II efforts at the age of 18, Americans had come to “know you as one of us, came to love you as standing fast with us for freedom, summoning across the oceans our values and our dreams.”

However, when the Queen stood up to the array of microphones all adjusted for the tall Bush, they obstructed much of her face.

The Queen’s face is blocked by microphones as she speaks on the South Lawn of the White House, as President George H.W. Bush looks on, May 14, 1991. (Doug Mills/AP Images)

But Bush said her outlook saved the day. “We had a good laugh about it,” Bush told Sally Bedell Smith. “Her humor made it all seem fine.”

“No wonder I cannot feel a stranger here,” she said later that night. “The British have never felt America to be a foreign land.”

Bush also took the Queen to a baseball game:

NEXT: Bill Clinton and Elizabeth II

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