Britannias: Watch Daniel Day-Lewis Spoof Clint Eastwood’s RNC Speech

Daniel Day-Lewis has repeatedly proven he can play anyone — cerebral palsy-stricken artist Christy Brown in My Left Foot, warrior Hawkeye in Last of the Mohicans, the blood-thirsty Butcher in Gangs of New York, lusty Guido in Nine, and now our 16th president in Lincoln, out next week (November 16). And he has two Oscars to show for it.

But nothing prepared us for his greatest role yet, which he fulfilled at this week’s Britannia Awards (November 7): spoofing Clint Eastwood‘s RNC chat with an “an invisible President Obama.” All seemed set to script when Lincoln director Steven Spielberg presented the Stanley Kubrick Award for Excellence in Film to Mr. Day-Lewis. That is, until the British actor charged the stage, his chair in tow. He apologized to the audience that he was a bit “groggy,” as he’d spent the previous night watching U.S. election results stream in from CNN. And with a nod to the empty chair beside him, he said, “I’m glad that, taking time out of his very busy schedule, the recently re-elected President of this country was able to make it.”

This was just a bit of the shenanigans that happened at the Britannia Awards, which like the Golden Globes, are hosted in the Beverly Hilton Hotel and feature celebrities at their loosest. In addition to Day-Lewis’ Eastwood, we had Josh Gad and Judi Dench flirting with Daniel Craig, host Alan Cumming starting a rumor about Olivia Munn‘s true gender, and a truly amazing and daring tribute to Trey Parker and Matt Stone from John Cleese, Ricky Gervais, and a certain late-night chat show host. Catch all of the festivities for the first time on BBC AMERICA this Sunday (November 11) at 7:30 pm ET.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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