WATCH: Olympic Gymnast Louis Smith Displays Hip Action on UK ‘Dancing with the Stars’

Louis Smith (center) backstage at ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ (Photo: BBC)

One of the more scintillating aspects of Dancing with the Stars is watching ridiculously fit celebrities undulating in lycra suits. And few are fitter than British gymnast Louis Smith, two-time Olympic medalist at the 2012 London Games, who demonstrated his command on the cha-cha on Strictly Come Dancing, the original British version of Dancing with the Stars which premiered its first live show this past Saturday (October 6). Here’s a bit of his Saturday Night Fever-inspired first dance:

Nice display of his gymnastics prowess at the end – the dance scored a 27 out of 40. If you’re at all curious about what he’s hiding beneath that painted-on layer of fabric, this will educate you:

Meanwhile, compare Louis’ cha cha to that of Colin Salmon, frequent star of Bond films and Resident Evil movies. (Plus, he’s played David Tyrel on Hex and Dr. Moon on the Doctor Who eps “Silence in the Library” and “Forest of the Dead.”) He takes to his first Latin dance with spindly elegance, and do admire his leopard-skin get-up:

This dance received a 23 out of 40.

Speaking of elegance, look at Jerry Hall, serving up Alexis Carrington divaness in a fur shawl, flaunting her still-magnificent curves in her cha cha. It’s enough to bring a tear to Mick Jagger‘s eye.

Jerry’s score: a not-too-spectacular 18. Ah, there’s still another chance for her to improve next time, when she’s try out the foxtrot.

However, the following dance, from Emmerdale star Lisa Riley, topped the leaderboard with a 30 out of 40. It’s exuberance brought judge Bruno Tonioli to his feet:

Which was your favorite dance? Tell us below:

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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