Jonny Lee Miller Praises Benedict Cumberbatch’s ‘Sherlock’: ‘I’m a Groupie’

Dueling Sherlocks: Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller (Photos: BBC, CBS)

There are apparently no bad blood between Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller over their dueling Sherlock Holmes. Miller, star of CBS’ New York-set fall series Elementary, told Britain’s Metro: “I love the work that Benedict has done with Sherlock. I would call him up, like a groupie, after every episode came out, wanting to talk to him about it. And we had a discussion about this project as well.”

Miller told The Mirror: “Benedict has been very, very supportive, and, you know, I wanted to reassure him about how different this script was and project was.

“We get to show a whole new side to him.

“At the end of the day, these are just television shows. Is there room on planet earth for another Sherlock Holmes? Yes, I think there probably is. It has been being made for close to 100 years.”

Cumberbatch and Miller know each other well, of course: they did a much-beloved production of Frankenstein last year, trading the parts of Frankenstein and his monster. But Cumberbatch, Emmy-nominated star of Masterpiece’s Sherlock, stirred up a bit of controversy with his comments to Shorlist, in which he declared he was “cynical” about why Elementary was launched.

Meanwhile, Elementary has performed well for CBS: for its October 18 episode, it scored nearly 11 million viewers and 2.3 18-49 rating. And it’s doing well among DVR viewers.

Now that a few episodes of Elementary have aired, how do you think Jonny Lee Miller is doing as Sherlock?

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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