If a British Doctor Invites You to ‘Surgery,’ Should You Be Worried?

3. 999 vs. 911

Credit: AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Accidents happen, even to the best of us. Exhibit A: During his 1931 visit to the U.S., Britain’s most famous modern political leader, Winston Churchill, stepped out of a taxi on New York City’s Fifth Avenue and was struck down by a car. Had he not received prompt medical help, world history might have been altered for the worse.

True, the U.S. didn’t have the 911 emergency service back in Churchill’s day. But now it does. Importantly, visitors to the UK should know that Britain uses a different number, 999, as the free hot-line to call whenever someone’s life is in danger. Put 999 on speed dial during your next visit to Britain, because you never know. You might not only save someone from catastrophe, but, by saving him or her, you might even help secure the fate of the Free World.

NEXT: It’s a bad sign if you’re ‘giddy’ in a British hospital. Here’s why:

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