WATCH: Exclusive Sneak Peek at BBC America’s Original ‘Doctor Who’ Specials

Which Doctor Who monster would make the best roommate? What’s the most fashionable Timelord headgear, fez or Stetson? And, of course, the age-old question, pool in the TARDIS or Vortex Manipulator watch?

BBC America put forth these very questions to celebrity Doctor Who fans as well as to devoted viewers who packed the exhibition floor at last month’s San Diego Comic-Con. Their frank and funny answers will be featured in three original specials the network has announced to feed the Whovian need as we count down the nanoseconds until the August 27 fall premiere. Here’s the schedule – mark the calendars and set those DVRs:

Doctor Who: Best of the Doctor – Saturday, August 13 at 9/8c.
Doctor Who: Best of the Monsters – Saturday, August 20 at 9/8c.
Doctor Who: Best of the Companions – Saturday, August 27 following the Doctor Who premiere episode, “Let’s Kill Hitler,” which airs at 9/8c.

The lineup is a Who’s Who of DW fandom: Alison Haislip (The Voice, G4 correspondent), Chris Hardwick (Nerdist), Scott Adsit (30 Rock), Natalie Morales (Parks and Recreation), Eugene Mirman (Flight of the Conchords, Bob’s Burgers), WIRED Magazine senior editor Adam Rogers, singer-songwriter Amanda Palmer (Dresden Dolls), comedian/musician Reggie Watts, Danielle Harris (the Halloween franchise), comedian Paul F. Tompkins, former NFL player Hugh Douglas, and guitar hero Scott Ian (Anthrax). And Who fan fave Mark Sheppard — Canton Delaware III from the two-part season opener — will also be joining the festivities.

We’ve gotten our mittens on an exclusive sneak peek at the specials. Here, Alison Haislip, Chris Hardwick, Scott Adsit, and Reggie Watts totally geek out over Doctor Who lead writer Steven Moffat‘s ingenious monster creation, The Silence.


Which Doctor Who monster would you want to bunk with? Tell us.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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