The Queen’s Handbag Sets New Trend

The Queen's Handbag

The Queen talks to the Duchess of Cornwall and Carole Middleton outside Westminster Abbey

We already knew that Kate Middleton was having a huge effect on the world of ladies’ fashion, having seen high street copies of the dress she wore to announce her engagement simply fly out of the shops, and no doubt the same is happening with her wedding dress, and the bridesmaids’ dresses, and the sale of red uniforms for men.

But one development we didn’t expect was that the sales of Launer London handbags would’ve seen a bump, after the Queen was seen carrying a particularly nice cream calfskin bag to the wedding.

They may have a royal warrant, which means their products can carry the royal crest and the motto “By appointment to Her Majesty the Queen,” but that doesn’t necessarily mean their products will catch the public imagination. But it seems that they have.

Now Launers have told Elle magazine that their sales are up 60%, and it’s not just older ladies that are seeking that regal look. Of that 60%, 20% are women aged between 35 and 50. And let’s be honest, they’re going to get a lot more use out of their bags than the Queen is of hers.

Other famous fans of the Launer bag include Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, Baroness Thatcher and Dame Judi Dench. Clearly this is a product which can only be properly carried by indomitable women.

Would you take style tips from the Queen? Tell us here.

Fraser McAlpine

Fraser has been writing and broadcasting about music and popular culture for over 13 years, first at the Top of the Pops website, and most recently for the NME. He also wrote BBC Radio 1's Chart Blog and reviews albums for BBC Music.

He is Anglophenia's current resident Brit, blogging about British slang and running around the Mall taking snaps of the crowd at the Royal Wedding, as well as reigniting a childhood passion for classic Doctor Who and cramming as much music in as he can manage.

Fraser invites you to join him on Twitter: @csi_popmusic

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