Party in the NYC: ‘Doctor Who’ Fans Turn Out for U.S. Premiere Screening

All My Amy Ponds: fans in costume have been queueing up for today's Doctor Who screening: 4/11/11

I guess when I said to arrive early, people took it to heart. Quite literally since last night, fans have been lining up outside the Village East Cinema in New York for this evening’s premiere screening of Doctor Who‘s two-part season opener. And when I say, “Last night,” I mean since Sunday, April 10. Thank goodness for moderate overnight temperatures in the city.

The Waiting for the Doctor blog has been doing a fine job of document the day’s (and previous night’s) events, including a surprise appearance from the Doctor Who cast to provide fans with donuts and pose for photos. The New York Times has also been covering the story, chatting with Steve Albistur, the manager of the cinema, who said that crowds were “much bigger than anticipated.” Village East has opened up a third theater for the massive crowds, and some people still may not get in. Albistur says the turnout for this kind of event was unprecedented.

We’ve been out-and-about snapping pics as well. Most of those shots are up on the BBC America Facebook page (see here and here), and there will be more where that came from as the day goes on.

Also, keep an eye on the Anglophenia Twitter account: I’ll be live-tweeting the screening and the following Q&A with Matt Smith, Karen Gillan, Arthur Darvill, Alex Kingston, and Steven Moffat. Catch you soon.

By the way, just this afternoon, we had our own company screening of the premiere, and Moffat, the entire cast, and exec producers Piers Wenger and Beth Willis did an introduction. Here are some snaps:

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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