Watch: I’m 18 and I Still Suck a Pacifier

Little Britain showed us the oddball side of the UK through Matt Lucas and David Walliams‘ fictional creations, but now here’s the real-life version. British broadcaster BBC3 is airing a documentary show titled Freak Like Me, premiering next Monday. (Yes, it shares a title with the Adina Howard song that later became a Sugababes song.) In the six-part series, comedian Russell Kane “uncovers and celebrates the astounding breadth of Britain’s weird and wonderful personal habits and obsessions – and reveals just how widespread they really are.”

First up, we have a a lovely 18-year-old student who is seemingly ordinary except in one way – she still sucks a pacifier (which is referred to as a “dummy” in the UK). This first clip finds her taking sneaky hits from her dummy in an exclusive boutique. She tells the camera, “When I’m out like this in a shop, and I fancy a suck, I have a look around, pretend to try on a couple of things, and go into a fitting room with my dummy.” Oh man, the things I could say right now that would get me into trouble.

In this next clip, a group of ordinary Brits are asked how often they change their underwear. In spite of the posh accents involved here, there are some answers that will certainly make one cringe. To the lady who says she only changes her bra when “as soon as it smells,” I’m betting that the rest of us smell it long before you do.

In the next video, we have a dance instructor who is absolutely fixated on squeezing the hell out of pimples, whether they belong to her or not. The squeamish should avoid 0:52:

Would you like to see Freak Like Me in the U.S.?

by Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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