The UK Charts Welcome a New Breed of Boyband

Everyone knows that the age of the boyband is well and truly over, right? You couldn’t move for the blighters around here for a while, standing in a line and doing those funny synchronized kicky dance steps like the floor was electrified, and wearing asymmetrical beards and funny tramlines cut into their eyebrows.

It was an amazing period in history, albeit one which nobody was really desperate to re-experience. And yet, minds immeasurably superior to ours have decided that now is the time to release a new breed of boyband into the wild, Jurassic Park style.

The Wanted are, on paper at least, your classic old-school boyband. There are five of them. Some of them look boyish and cute, some look rough and ready, and one looks like Elvis, if Elvis were the son of a giraffe. Their first single – “All Time Low” – got to No. 1 a couple of months ago, largely because of two very important things:

Thing 1: A massive TV and marketing campaign, which saw them beaming from all manner of magazines, websites, and TV shows in the UK.

Thing 2: “All Time Low” is the kind of yearning, twisty modern pop song that deserves to be a chart-topper. Much like Bruno Mars‘s “Just The Way You Are,” which has crept back up to the top spot this week, “All Time Low” defies all (low) expectations of boyband pop, by being mature and catchy in equal measure.

And to consolidate their success, the band’s second single – “Heart Vacancy” – has now entered the charts at No. 2, which is kind of fitting.

Here’s the video:

Elsewhere in this week’s chart, Katy Perry‘s “Firework” goes off without causing too much damage at No. 5, Jay Sean‘s hookup with Nicki Minaj fails to end the world at No. 10, and N-Dubz fail to get any higher than No. 11, even though they are on their “Best Behaviour.”

For the rest of this week’s chart, Radio 1 has the full rundown.
What’s your favorite boyband song? Let me know your thoughts.

by Fraser McAlpine

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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