As Temps Drop, British Music Fans Seek Warmth

So, here’s how the UK Top 3 currently stands:

1: Tinie Tempah ft. Eric Turner“Written In The Stars”
2: Bruno Mars“Just The Way You Are”
3: Labrinth“Let The Sun Shine”

They are, respectively, a song about the redemptive power of working hard and believing in yourself, a song about how astonishingly lovely Bruno Mars’s girlfriend is, and a carpe diem sort of a song about taking the time to enjoy the moments of wonder in your life, whenever they come along.

Add to this Adele’s still-jawdropping cover of Bob Dylan’s “Make You Feel My Love,” which has leapt to No.4 off the back of the song’s appearance on the X Factor, and you’ve got the most reassuring, warm blanket of a top end of the chart since records began, surely?

I mean, what we’ve grown used to is a steady diet of pneumatic songs about sex, or mirror-kissing peacock songs about going clubbing. Tenderness and affection have been at a premium this year. Or at least, they have until now.

OK, Taio Cruz is still at No.5, hanging on to his delighted night out like grim death, but if this chart tells us anything, it’s that the combination of TV reality show sob stories and the oncoming winter is making people feel a bit fragile, a bit sentimental, and completely in need of looking after.

It’s basically Seasonal Affective Disorder, manifested into a cluster of songs which have enveloped the chart like a warm hug.

And if you’re feeling it too, why not make yourself a nice warm milky drink and settle down with Adele. Go on, It’ll do you the world of good.

Elsewhere in the chart: Kylie is back (No.12)! The Wombats are back (No.23)! And Mark Ronson’s ode to pedal power struggles to climb the hill up into the Top 10.

For the rest of this week’s chart, Radio 1 has the full rundown.
What’s YOUR perfect song of reassurance? Let me know your thoughts.

by Fraser McAlpine

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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