So Long, San Diego Comic-Con!

I’ve finally lost my Comic-Con virginity, and while the first time wasn’t exactly gentle, it was a memorable and quite pleasurable experience. This convention is five full days of sensory overload – it’s like five Times Squares, three Disney Worlds, and a Tokyo all in one building. Everywhere you look, there’s something flashing, something blinking, or maybe even someone nearly naked. (Yes, there’s even a touch of Amsterdam at Comic-Con.) But once you get past the surface, you see a lot of heart and ingenuity on display here.

San Diego is a great host city. Of course, it is – once a year they get 140,000 demographically desirable people to come to the city and spend loads of money. You think this town isn’t gonna roll out the red carpet for all of them? (I’m sure SD is praying they get to keep Comic-Con). Nevertheless, I must give the city credit for the creative touches they employed around the convention center:

I enjoyed my time hanging with cast and creator of BBC AMERICA’s Being Human. I’ll try not to sound too much like a fawning fanboy, but for all their genetic gifts, the cast members are remarkably unassuming and normal. And just so much fun.

And the fans, of course, make Comic-Con what it is. Some of the costumes I saw made me gape in awe at their meticulousness. Check out the super-sharp Doctor Who costumes we saw just today:

I’ll have more Comic-Con photos and videos to share with you in the coming days. But for now, time to hang up my Dalek hat and head back to the sweltering, smelly Dutch oven that is New York City. Cheers, folks.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

See more posts by Kevin Wicks