M.I.A. Disses Lady Gaga, Calls Her a “Great Mimic”

  • M.I.A. is throwing some serious shade about Lady Gaga in an interview with NME, telling the UK-based music mag: “None of her music’s reflective of how weird she wants to be or thinks she is…She models herself on Grace Jones and Madonna, but the music sounds like 20 year-old Ibiza disco. She’s not progressive, but she’s a good mimic. She sounds more like me than I f***ing do! That’s a talent…but she’s the industry’s last stab at making itself important.”

    M.I.A. isn’t the first UK artist to diss Gaga: last year, La Roux frontwoman Elly Jackson slammed Gaga’s vocals: “There are so few females actually singing nowadays. With girls, it’s either empty, hollow girl pop like The Saturdays or the half-speaking-half-singing mockney thing or Lady Gaga, which I don’t think you can call singing.” I hate when artists take swipes at each other; it almost always comes off as professional jealousy (and usually is).

  • Could American Idol launch Will Young‘s career in the States? The singer is stoked that his song “Leave Right Now” has been chosen to play during eliminations on the reality hit. If you recall, Daniel Powter‘s “Bad Day” became a No. 1 hit in America after American Idol used it to send off departing contestants. (MTV UK)
  • BBC NEWS looks back at the late Malcolm McLaren and his impact on music.
  • Joe Corre, Malcolm’s son with designer Vivienne Westwood, was present when he died.(Daily Mail)
  • The Guardian‘s Alexis Petridis says McLaren will be as controversial in death as he was in life.
  • Blur is releasing their first new single in seven years, but only in the UK and only in certain independent retailers. Oh, and there will be only 1,000 copies. eBay, here we come.(BBC)
  • Telephone, telegraph, tell Rihanna: the “Umbrella” singer has outed Russell Brand and Katy Perry‘s Indian wedding plans.(Daily Mail)
  • The Guardian‘s Stuart Heritage suggests some black actors who could play Bond. Idris Elba is my personal choice.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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