The British Nominees for Golden Globes

The Golden Globe nominations were announced today, and while British actors did not, as in many years, dominate the list, there were several UK performers who were recognized. Notably, three of the five nominees for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama were British: Emily Blunt for The Young Victoria, Dame Helen Mirren for The Last Station, and upstart Carey Mulligan for An Education.

Emily Blunt

Helen Mirren

Carey Mulligan

Actor Colin Firth, who was just interviewed by Anglophenia guest blogger Tom Brook, was nominated for his role in A Single Man

Colin Firth interview

A Single Man trailer

House star Hugh Laurie was once again nominated for Best Actor in Drama Series. The British comedian-turned-dramatic actor already has two Golden Globes to his name.

Another category overrun with Brits is the Best Actor in a Miniseries or Made-for-TV Movie category. Chiwetel Ejiofor (Endgame), Kenneth Branagh (Wallander: One Step Behind), and Jeremy Irons (Georgia O’Keefe) were nominees in that category. They face Irish actor Brendan Gleeson, who was nominated for his performance as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in Into the Storm.

Chiwetel Ejiofor

Kenneth Branagh

Jeremy Irons

Brendan Gleeson

Two BBC films were shortlisted in the Miniseries or Made-for-TV category: Into the Storm and Little Dorrit, which swept the Emmys back in September.

Little Dorrit

Oh, if that’s not Brit-tastic enough for you, the shindig this year will be hosted by none other than Extras and Office star Ricky Gervais. He’s been a mainstay of the Globes for the past few years, providing priceless moments like this one:

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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