There’s Still Time To Replace Jude Law with David Tennant

  • The New York TimesBen Brantley gives Jude Law‘s performance in Hamlet a lukewarm review: “If vigor were all in acting Shakespeare, Jude Law would be a gold medal Hamlet…His Hamlet – which has only increased in intensity, if not in depth, since I saw it in London last summer – is, above all, an externalizer, never shy about acting out his inner conflicts and acting on his instincts. It is hard to understand the distress of Hamlet’s friends and family when he feigns madness, since the prince, in this case, appears to be as he always was: sarcastic, contemptuous, quick-witted and mad only in the sense of being really, really angry.”
  • OK, so not all Jude’s reviews were bad… (BBC NEWS)
  • Author Hilary Mantel has won this year’s Booker Prize for her novel, Wolf Hall, a fictionalized version of the life of Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII‘s right-hand man.(The Times)
  • True Blood is coming to British TV (via Channel 4), and English-born star Stephen Moyer talks to BBC NEWS.(BBC)
  • Amy Winehouse will sing backup for her goddaughter, 13-year-old Dionne Bromfield, on this week’s Strictly Come Dancing.(BBC)
  • Cat Deeley will return to the UK to host the British version of So You Think You Can Dance.(The Stage)
  • The BBC’s iPlayer may soon be available outside the UK – but for a fee.
  • Apparently, publicly discussing a woman’s hoo-hah while hosting an awards ceremony is the way to her heart: Russell Brand and Katy Perry are dating and living it up in Paris.
  • Paolo Nutini is not sold on this whole Twitter thing: “I don’t really get it. I do have an account but it’s not always me updating it.”(The Sun)
  • Keeley Hawes finally gets a decent hairdo on Ashes To Ashes. See, not all ’80s haircuts make a person look mentally ill.(Daily Mail)
  • The Daily Mail gives more details on Kevin McGee‘s life, his failed marriage to Matt Lucas, and his tragic death.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

See more posts by Kevin Wicks