New Comedies Hit BBCA: The Inbetweeners and Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show

Doesn’t anybody remember *laughter*?

We do.

BBC AMERICA’s schedule is about to get a lot funnier this year, with the additions of the The Inbetweeners and Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show. The former is a Freaks and Geeks-esque sitcom (just for you, Loretta!) and the latter is a sketch show. (Think Catherine Tate meets Tracey Ullman meets French & Saunders.) Not sure on the airdates yet, but keep checking BBC AMERICA’s brand-new Coming Soon page for updates.

The official BBCA press releases and clips of the shows are below:

THE INBETWEENERS – U.S. PREMIERE

“Written and created by Damon Beesley and Iain Morris – who were involved with Peep Show, The 11 O’Clock Show, and The Flight of the ConchordsThe Inbetweeners offers a painfully funny take on the squirming humiliations of teenage life. Will’s parents have just divorced, and he has unwillingly had to move and change schools, forcing him to make an all new set of friends. His newly found peers – Simon, Jay and Neil – are not so cool. Marooned in middle-class suburbia, The Inbetweeners follows the four friends as they try to navigate the minefield of futile crushes, sibling brawls, getting drunk too quickly, riding roller coasters, and fancying the girl next door.”

Clip #1 – Bringing Up Baby
Clip #2 – Larks at the Park
Clip #3 – Clutch Control

KATY BRAND’S BIG ASS SHOW – U.S. PREMIERE

Sketch comedy Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show is a whimsical universe of original characters and crazy celebrities with big egos and even bigger flaws. Full to the brim with pop star skits on everyone from Lily Allen to Usher, spoofs of Kate Moss and Kate Winslet, as well as original creations, Katy has created an alternative world of celebrities: a warm and accessible world, in which their best and worst characteristics are amplified for comic effect.

Clip #1 – Kate Moss
Clip #2 – Lily Allen
Clip #3 – Amy Winehouse

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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