Britain’s Got Talent’s Susan Boyle Becomes Web Sensation

  • Is Susan Boyle the new Paul Potts? Last week, the dowdy Julia Child lookalike left Simon Cowell and his fellow Britain’s Got Talent judges slack-jawed with her confident performance of “I Dreamed a Dream.” “This is the biggest surprise I’ve seen in all three years of this show,” said Piers Morgan. On YouTube, her performance has well over one million views. One aside: Ant and Dec, the hosts of Britain’s Got Talent, are too annoying to breathe, and they show it in the clip. I don’t know how the Brits tolerate them.
  • UK broadcaster Channel 4 is set to premiere an “educational” show featuring nude models being sketched. “The show, provisionally titled Life Class: Today’s Nude, hopes to promote a return to elementary skills of drawing and painting, and spark a revival of more traditional, figurative art.” And you can pant, er, paint along at home.(The Independent)
  • In photos: Queen Elizabeth II‘s meetings with eleven U.S. presidents.(Telegraph)
  • The Stage interviewed both David Tennant and Michelle Ryan about the Doctor Who Easter special.
  • Robert Plant‘s velvet pants “infuriated” Duane Allman.(Contact Music)
  • Procol Harum‘s “A Whiter Shade of Pale” has been the most-played song (in public, that is) in Britain over the past 75 years.(BBC)
  • Michael Sheen “will portray the leader of the Volturi, an Italy-based coven of vampires” in the Twilight sequel.(Variety)
  • The star of Ricky Gervais‘ directorial debut? Two-time Oscar nominee Ralph Fiennes.(Mirror)
  • Kate Moss is embraced by Marc Jacobs and Justin Timberlake in a Vanity Fair spread.(Just Jared)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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