BBC AMERICA on Broadway: The Norman Conquests Garners Rave Reviews

The Broadway revival of Alan Ayckbourn‘s trilogy, The Norman Conquests, currently stars a roll call of BBC AMERICA talent: Green Wing‘s Stephen Mangan, Spaced‘s Jessica Hynes, Coupling‘s Ben Miles, The RobinsonsAmanda Root, Viva Blackpool‘s Paul Ritter, and Amelia Bullmore (who plays Alex’s mother on Ashes To Ashes). The New York Times‘ theater reviewer Ben Brantley gives the trilogy and its actors rave notices.

“Ms. Hynes’ frowsy, brusque Annie; Ms. Root’s thin-lipped, controlling Sarah; Mr. Ritter’s passive, clownish Reg; Mr. Miles’ slow-thinking, stoical Tom; and Ms. Bullmore’s brittle, disaffected Ruth: all are as vivid as your own family at breakfast on the vacation from hell. Mr. Mangan’s oversexed, sheepdog-like Norman is magnetic to them all because he is their unedited ids incarnate: narcissistic, longing to dominate and oh so hungry for attention and affection.

“That the theater is in the round is not, for once, a disadvantage, because the backs and shoulders of these performers are as expressive of these bottled emotions as their faces are.”

NY1‘s Roma Torre is even more ecstatic over these performances:

“It’s as if they were born to [play] the roles. Just watch how these incredible actors plumb every juicy nuance embedded in their characters.”

The New York Daily NewsJoe Dziemianowicz gives the trilogy five stars and says:

“Much of the success owes to Matthew Warchus (“God of Carnage,” “Boeing-Boeing”), a director with a Midas touch for comedy who’s steered a wonderful, well-oiled cast from across the pond. The six actors draw you irresistibly into their exploits.”

For tickets, click here.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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