BAFTAs: The Street Upsets Life On Mars for Second Straight Year

Life On Mars denied again?! Many people assumed the show would triumph this year after its surprising loss last year, but, once again, The Street prevailed. But how can you begrudge anything Jimmy McGovern writes or produces? The man is one of the few TV scribes that can truly be called a genius.

It was a big night for the sitcom Gavin & Stacey, which won two awards, including Best Comedy Performance for James Corden (a.k.a. Lily Allen‘s luvvah). Cranford failed to clean up in spite of its field-leading four nominations; only Dame Eileen Atkins walked away with a gong. As for your BBCA favorites, Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares and Peep Show both won major awards. Here’s the list of winners:

Actor
Andrew Garfield, Boy A, Channel 4

Actress
Eileen Atkins, Cranford, BBC1

Entertainment performance
Harry Hill, Harry Hill’s TV Burp, ITV1

Comedy performance
James Corden, Gavin & Stacey, BBC3

Single drama
The Mark of Cain, Channel 4

Drama series
The Street, BBC1

Drama serial
Britz, Channel 4

Continuing drama
Holby City, BBC1

International
Heroes, BBC2

Factual series
The Tower: A Tale of Two Cities, BBC1

Specialist factual
Andrew Marr’s History of Modern Britain, BBC2

Single documentary
Lie of the Land, Channel 4

Features
Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares, C4

Current affairs
China’s Stolen Children: A Dispatches Special, Channel 4

News coverage
Sky News, Glasgow airport attack

Sport
ITV F1: Canadian Grand Prix Live

Interactivity
Spooks Interactive, bbc.co.uk/spooks

Entertainment programme
Harry Hill’s TV Burp, ITV1

Comedy programme
Fonejacker, Channel 4

Situation comedy
Peep Show, Channel 4

Audience award for programme of the year
Gavin & Stacey

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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