Yes, They’ve Made a Video Game of the Paul-Heather Divorce

  • Play Muccachucka, the Paul McCartney-Heather Mills online divorce game! Throw water on Fiona Shackleton and steal Paul’s money!(Mirror)
  • The Times profiles Corinne Bailey Rae. “She has spoken of missing her husband when either of them is away working, but has always seemed to have her feet firmly on the ground. ‘When you achieve success early on, it can shape your identity. I’m lucky in that I went to college, did mundane jobs and got married before all this happened.’ She likes to immerse herself in her songwriting and is convinced of the importance of music. ‘I hope my music is healing. I believe that music can encourage you to move on from painful events. It helps to make a scar fade.’”
  • Speaking of scars, Amy Winehouse re-defines “bad skin”.(Daily Mail)
  • Breakout star Estelle talks with BBC NEWS about collaborating with Kanye, black music in Britain, and her obsession with Ribena.
  • Hunter James gives us some of the story behind Neil Aspinall, the recently deceased manager of The Beatles, in The Guardian. Aspinall apparently died without ever giving up any of the band’s secrets.
  • A scene on EastEnders showing a wife burying her husband alive sparked quite the fury amongst viewers.(BBC)
  • Kate Moss has tricked out a taxi cab her friends bought her. According to The Mirror, her boyfriend, Jamie Hince, has already “arranged for the steering wheel to be personalized with her initials, and is getting the cab fitted with an iPod and six speakers, plus a hands-free mobile kit. Kate has raised the possibility of leopard skin backseats and furry dice. No one’s sure if she’s joking or not.” The price of the cab? Around $80,000.
  • The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, Anthony Minghella‘s final film, was a ratings hit for the BBC.(Variety)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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