An Update On the Life On Mars 1980s Spin-Off: ‘More Miami Vice Than The Sweeney’

  • The Times has some info on the upcoming Life On Mars spin-off Ashes to Ashes. The 1980s will find Gene Hunt, played by Philip Glenister, coming up against Thatcherism and new policing practices. Ashley Pharoah says, “A very specific era of policing is coming to an end. I think there’s a slight sense of melancholy to Gene at times – he misses the North and the old days. But he’s a fighter, he refuses to give up.” Also of note: “Hunt is reluctantly wedged into a Bryan Ferry-style shiny suit while his co-stars adopt the primary colours of the era. The design is ‘more Miami Vice than The Sweeney,’ producers said. The cast are awarded moustaches, mullets (men) and lots of blue eye shadow (women).” Ashes To Ashes will premiere on the BBC next month.
  • Simon Cowell is on the anti-manboob diet.(Mirror)
  • How the writers’ strike is affecting British fans of American television: could Billie Piper‘s Secret Diary of a Call Girl be shown on CBS?(The Times)
  • In totally psycho news: Is Naomi Campbell dating Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, whom she recently interviewed for GQ? Campbell’s people are denying it.
  • David Beckham‘s Armani billboards appear to have pleased wife Victoria Beckham. “I’m proud to see his penis 25 feet tall,” she says.(The Sun)
  • From Scared Straight to Scared Skinny: in an exposé on Britain’s bad eating habits, Jamie Oliver will show viewers the autopsy of an overweight man.(Daily Mail)
  • A long Independent interview with actor Timothy Spall.
  • Sir Roger Moore is campaigning to have medals given to Britain’s fallen and wounded soldiers.(Mirror)
  • Actress Gwyneth Paltrow has been hospitalized in New York for “undisclosed reasons,” according to Page Six. Her husband, Coldplay frontman Chris Martin, allegedly had a confrontation with photographers outside the hospital.

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

See more posts by Kevin Wicks