Can’t We Go a Day Without Winehouse In the News?

There’s more drama in the world of Amy Winehouse today, and, reliably, her husband Blake Fielder-Civil is at the center: after police raided the couple’s London home, Blake was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to fix his upcoming assault trial. Allegedly, Fielder-Civil and an acquaintance savagely beat bartender James King, which led to assault charges. According to The Mirror, Fielder-Civil and his friend offered King £200,000 to withdraw the charges. Also, they allegedly arranged to have King flown to Spain before he could testify in the trial. Pretty unsavory stuff.

Winehouse was present when Fielder-Civil was taken into custody, and not even Alex Cox himself could have staged such a dramatic departure scene:

As eight plain-clothed officers manacled Fielder-Civil and led him off to cells, the tearful jazz diva begged hysterically: “I want to go with him.”

Then she stood on tiptoe, threw her arms around his neck, hugged and kissed him and repeatedly said: “Baby, I love you. Baby, I’ll be fine.” Finally, weeping and hyperventilating Amy, 24, ran out of the flat and shouted to Fielder-Civil in the courtyard below: “I’ll be fine. Baby, I love.”

Fielder-Civil managed to shout back “I love you” before being bundled into an unmarked people carrier.

I pray that these two don’t book a reservation at the Chelsea Hotel anytime soon…

In other news:

  • Heather Mills has been dumped by her divorce lawyers, The Sun reports, because of her insistence on doing interviews and her refusal to comply with a gag order regarding baby Beatrice. The Times says this makes a February 2008 court trial against Sir Paul McCartney almost inevitable.
  • When The Spice Girls moved their release date up a week to avoid a chart battle with Westlife, they jumped out of the frying pan and into the fire: they now face Leona Lewis, who is outselling them six-to-one in pre-orders, according to The Mirror.
  • The Smoking Gun has uncovered David Bowie‘s impossibly debonair mug shot from a 1976 marijuana possession arrest in Rochester, New York.
  • Radiohead did a live cover of Björk‘s “Unravel” as a “testcast” for an official live performance on Radiohead.TV, which should air between 4 pm and 7 pm EST today.
  • Stereogum alerts us to the Arctic Monkeys‘ new Roman Coppola-directed video for “Teddy Picker.”
  • Howard Donald is off the disabled list and back on tour with Take That, but The Sun‘s Victoria Newton says he didn’t do much dancing in his comeback gig.
  • The Guardian‘s Alexis Petridis calls Girls Aloud‘s new album, Tangled Up, a “pop masterpiece” in a four-star review. “It’s witty, diverse, experimental, and viscerally thrilling: what more do you want pop music to be? Frankly, the sort of person who claims they find nothing to love here is like the sort of person who claims to hate the Beatles: they’re either posturing or they’re an idiot. Either way, you should pay them no mind.”
  • Nadine Coyle, who insists she’s not back with Jesse Metcalfe, says she likes “men to wear the trousers. To tell me where we’re going. What we are doing.”(The Sun)
  • BBC NEWS reporter Jon Kelly says John Lydon, star of reunited Sex Pistols, has gone from punk to “pantomime” in his old age. “He plays the pantomime villain as enthusiastically as other any seasoned entertainer of three decades’ vintage. Strutting with mock-malevolence, hunched and gurning, he displays all the subversive menace and countercultural verve of Christopher Biggins playing Baron Hardup.”
  • The Guardian‘s Dave Simpson profiles Richard Ashcroft, frontman of the recently reformed Verve. Sampson suggests Ashcroft is an Emersonian figure: “Born in Wigan into a working-class family, he has hauled himself to the top of rock through herculean self-belief. ”
  • With his new album, Craig David attempts to regain his credibility with music listeners.(The Independent)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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