Victoria Beckham: Hollywood Laughingstock? Also: Eddie Murphy’s Maury Moment Arrives.

  • L.A. fashionistas are laughing at Victoria Beckham‘s garish sense of style, reports The Daily Mail. “LA style is all about being low key,” says stylist Cliff Hoppus. “It’s not about showing you have money or class, it’s about making the point that you are so comfortable in yourself that you can wear whatever you want. Real LA people know how to dress down.” Beckham, on the other hand, “looks as if she wants to get noticed. Most celebrities try to avoid that when getting off a plane.”
  • Eddie Murphy IS the father of Mel B.‘s bambina, say the DNA results.(E!)
  • David Beckham put on a helmet and shoulder pads for his first big American commercial. “The outfit was just part of a stunt used in an advertising campaign for Adidas in which Becks tries out American football and New Orleans Saints running back Reggie Bush tried out soccer.”
    (Daily Mail)
  • TV critic Kevin O’Sullivan slags off Big Brother (“Like a piece of furniture you’ve had for years, Big Brother is just there. You don’t notice it any more.”) and EastEnders (“the increasingly sinister soap [is] plumbing new depths of tastelessness”) in his Sunday Mirror column.
  • Comedian Lee Evans and Jessie Wallace, formerly Kat Slater on EastEnders, will play a London couple who move to a small town in a sitcom based on the Mike Leigh film, Abigail’s Party.(Mirror)
  • Why is Doctor Who such a gay icon? The Guardian‘s Ed Hagan takes a stab at it: “With Russell T. Davies at the helm, the TV impresario that brought us Queer As Folk, this should be no surprise – yet it’s not immediately obvious to all. As a lifelong fan, Davies wanted to make something that would be a success and appeal to all members of society, but that most of all remained true to the show’s ethos of liberality and open-mindedness.”
  • The Guardian is being a bit more inclusive than the American Film Institute: they’re doing a list of the 1,000 Films You Must See Before You Die.
  • TV director-turned-Harry Potter helmer David Yates says he likes playing the Hollywood game: “In an ideal world, I’d bounce between big projects and no-budget TV dramas with fantastic scripts. A lot of Hollywood films tend to be bloated, bombastic, loud. At the same time, I do like the infrastructure of making a blockbuster; it’s like having a big train set. I’m very excited about going to see an Imax print of Order of the Phoenix because the last 20 minutes are in 3D…”(Guardian)
  • Absolutely Fabulous star Joanna Lumley reflects: “I haven’t missed out on much and I don’t regret anything. It’s no good thinking, ‘If I’d done that differently…’ Every day of our lives there’s a crossroads, and it always has an effect – but tomorrow there’s nothing to be done about it. I don’t think one can spend much time looking backwards – unless you’ve made a catastrophic mistake, in which case you must learn from it. I don’t feel I’ve made any catastrophic mistakes.” (Telegraph)
  • Madonna has shelled out $12 million on her sixth London home. “The American singer and her husband Guy Ritchie last week signed a contract on the 10-bedroom Georgian townhouse in London’s Marylebone.”
    (Daily Mail)
  • Ricky Gervais brought his comedy act to his parents’ funerals.
    (The Sun)
  • British tennis star Andy Murray will NOT play Wimbledon.(Guardian)
  • Actor Christian Bale actually “scarfs down a bowl of live maggots” in his latest movie, directed by Werner Herzog.(Page Six)
  • Lily Allen has been put up in $10,000-a-month New York apartment to record her sophomore album. But she told New York magazine that she’s “done nothing!”(Page Six)
  • Damon Albarn talks to The Daily Telegraph about his Chinese monkey opera.
  • London’s auction scene threatens to surprass New York’s.
    (New York Times)
  • Garbage‘s next single will be “Tell Me Where It Hurts,” releasing July 16th.(NME)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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