Paul Potts Gets Ripped by Critics. Also: George Michael Compared to Courtney Love

  • Opera critics have not been kind to Britain’s Got Talent winner Paul Potts. Chicago Tribune art critic Alan G. Artner echoes these sentiments, claiming it was Puccini’s “Nessun Dorma” itself, not Potts’ talent, that ultimately moved the judges and audiences.
  • Gay blog AfterElton chides George Michael for his bad behavior: “It is just too sad to see him turn into the Courtney Love of gay pop. Michael’s recent life has been riddled with drugs, bathroom sex, and arrests, and now as we learned recently, no HIV/AIDS test in three years. Deeply saddening to hear, considering this is just one day after National HIV Testing Day.”
  • Video: Pete Doherty and Kate Moss sing “I Wanna Be Like You” from The Jungle Book at Glastonbury.(Now)
  • The Daily Mirror has apologized to Bryan Ferry, who issued a complaint about their story claiming he “sang the praises of the Nazis.”(Guardian)
  • Victoria Beckham “bravely” shows up at the Spice Girls press conference just days after a spider bite. And I thought the soldiers braving roadside bombs and suicide attacks in Iraq were troopers.(The Sun)
  • The Spice Girls refused to sing at yesterday’s press conference.
    (Daily Mail)
  • The Sliced Girls: The Sun speculates on how much plastic surgery The Spice Girls have had over the years. Emma “Baby Spice” Bunton is the only member they feel is all-natural:”She may have had her teeth whitened and the odd face peel, but I think she is purely glowing from the excitement of soon becoming a mother.”
  • The Rolling Stones have issued a statement about an accident that killed two workers after their Madrid concert last night.(BBC)
  • Can Kate Middleton‘s disturbing weight loss be attributed to her split with Prince William?(Daily Mail)
  • Prince William wants to be Australia’s governor-general, but the country’s Prime Minister says “No, no, no.”(ABC News)
  • Perhaps Natasha Bedingfield would make a nice consolation prize for our man Wills, and she’s up for it, according toThe Sun.
  • Queen‘s Brian May has pulled out of a Diana memorial duet with Joss Stone to work on his “thesis.” That old excuse!(Mirror)
  • The Guardian‘s Richard Smith wonders why the princes didn’t recruit more acts who were big during Diana’s lifetime instead of hiring newbies like Stone and Bedingfield. “How about hearing some of the songs that soundtracked Diana’s life instead? When she began stepping out with Prince Charles in July 1980, Joy Division‘s ‘Love Will Tear Us Apart’ had just hit the charts. When they got married in July 1981, the nation celebrated by putting The Specials‘ ‘Ghost Town’ at number one. And when they separated, Whitney was wailing ‘I Will Always Love You’.” Well, the first act’s lead singer is dead, the second act has split up, and the third, well, let’s just say she wasn’t quite up to it at the time.
  • Tim Rice-Oxley of Keane defends Live Earth: “Live Earth is getting a bit of flak like all good events like this tend to. But you go to the middle of America and people are talking about it and hearing about it so it seems to be really doing the job that Al Gore wanted. We’re really excited to be part of it because its a very big show.”(NME)
  • The Guardian reviews Damon Albarn‘s Monkey: Journey to the West. “Albarn has certainly extended himself, encompassing a vast, brashly amplified melange of Chinese percussion, esoteric electronica (including an Ondes Martenot), and a blaring contraption of his own invention known as a Klaxophone. Yet, surprisingly for someone with Albarn’s melodic gift, there are no arias, thematic development or even much in the way of a memorable tune.”
  • Graham Coxon and Paul Weller have collaborated on a new single, “This Old Town,” which will be available for download on July 2.(Pitchfork)
  • The band Idlewild will show their Scots pride with a free concert outside the Scottish parliament.(Scotsman)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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