Kele Okereke: Oasis “Made Stupidity Hip”

The frontman for Bloc Party is just the man to go toe-to-toe with the Gallagher brothers: Kele Okereke is whip-smart, well-read, and fearless. As prickly and blustering as he may seem, he outclasses them on nearly every level. Check out Kele's withering take on Oasis in Uncut Magazine, re-printed at U.TV:

"I think Oasis are the most overrated and pernicious band of all time. They had a totally negative and dangerous impact upon the state of British music.

"They have made stupidity hip. They claim to be inspired by the Beatles but, and this so saddens me, they have failed to grasp that the Beatles were about constant change and evolution. Oasis are repetitive Luddites."

Ouch, I'm not the biggest fan of Bloc Party's music, but I've rarely seen an Oasis summary so precise.

And witness his attention to detail:

Asked about [Noel] Gallagher`s "University Challenge" remark, Okereke said: "Well, it`s quite funny. It probably would have been a lot more funny had he not used exactly the same words to describe Travis a couple of years ago."

And he responds to the question he refused to answer in the San Francisco Chronicle: "Cocaine can be very attractive, very seductive. But for me it`s bad news because that drug can really damage your voice. The drug I do enjoy taking is ecstasy, which gives a real sense of euphoria."

In other Oasis-related news:

  • Noel is more charitable than Liam. (The Sun)
  • Maybe Noel is better off without Liam after all. (The Times)
  • Noel on his child with Sara MacDonald: "I'm looking forward to seeing a direct cross between me and my missus because she is gorgeous and I'm a genius. F***ing god help ya." (Mirror)

Kevin Wicks

Kevin Wicks founded BBCAmerica.com's Anglophenia blog back in 2005 and has been translating British culture for an American audience ever since. While not British himself - he was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri - he once received inordinate hospitality in London for sharing the name of a dead but beloved EastEnders character. His Anglophilia stems from a high school love of Morrissey, whom he calls his "gateway drug" into British culture.

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